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Susceptibility to smoking among South East Asian youth: a multilevel analysis.
Tob Control. 2008 Jun; 17(3):190-7.TC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To estimate the extent to which susceptibility to smoking is associated with between-context differences (schools and classes) and to identify factors at school, class and individual levels that influence individual susceptibility to smoking among young never-smokers in South East Asia.

METHODS

Cross-sectional data from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey conducted in Cambodia (2002), Laos (2003) and Vietnam (2003) are used to conduct multilevel analyses that account for the nesting of students in classes and classes in schools. The outcome variable is smoking susceptibility, defined as the absence of a firm decision not to smoke. Explanatory variables include school-level (current tobacco use prevalence in school, exposure to anti-smoking media messages and exposure to tobacco billboard advertising), class-level (classroom prevention) and individual-level influences (parents' and friends' smoking behaviour, knowledge of the harmful effects of and exposure to secondhand smoke at home, age, sex and pocket income).

RESULTS

Multilevel analyses indicate that 4.5% and 4.2% of the variation in smoking susceptibility is associated with school and class differences, respectively. Students who have parents or friends who smoke, who are exposed to secondhand smoke at home and those who have access to pocket income are found to be more susceptible while greater knowledge of the harmful effects of secondhand smoke appears to diminish susceptibility to smoking. For girls only, billboard tobacco advertising increases the risk of susceptibility and classroom prevention decreases risk while for boys only, attendance at schools with higher prevalence of tobacco use increases risk of susceptibility and anti-smoking media messages decreases risk.

CONCLUSIONS

This study highlights a number of modifiable factors associated with smoking susceptibility and identifies interactions between teen sex and several factors associated with the susceptibility to smoking. This finding provides support for the call to move beyond gender-blind tobacco control policies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, Health Sciences Centre 3H1, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 3Z5. guindoge@mcmaster.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18285382

Citation

Guindon, G E., et al. "Susceptibility to Smoking Among South East Asian Youth: a Multilevel Analysis." Tobacco Control, vol. 17, no. 3, 2008, pp. 190-7.
Guindon GE, Georgiades K, Boyle MH. Susceptibility to smoking among South East Asian youth: a multilevel analysis. Tob Control. 2008;17(3):190-7.
Guindon, G. E., Georgiades, K., & Boyle, M. H. (2008). Susceptibility to smoking among South East Asian youth: a multilevel analysis. Tobacco Control, 17(3), 190-7. https://doi.org/10.1136/tc.2007.022285
Guindon GE, Georgiades K, Boyle MH. Susceptibility to Smoking Among South East Asian Youth: a Multilevel Analysis. Tob Control. 2008;17(3):190-7. PubMed PMID: 18285382.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Susceptibility to smoking among South East Asian youth: a multilevel analysis. AU - Guindon,G E, AU - Georgiades,K, AU - Boyle,M H, Y1 - 2008/02/19/ PY - 2008/2/21/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/2/21/entrez SP - 190 EP - 7 JF - Tobacco control JO - Tob Control VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To estimate the extent to which susceptibility to smoking is associated with between-context differences (schools and classes) and to identify factors at school, class and individual levels that influence individual susceptibility to smoking among young never-smokers in South East Asia. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey conducted in Cambodia (2002), Laos (2003) and Vietnam (2003) are used to conduct multilevel analyses that account for the nesting of students in classes and classes in schools. The outcome variable is smoking susceptibility, defined as the absence of a firm decision not to smoke. Explanatory variables include school-level (current tobacco use prevalence in school, exposure to anti-smoking media messages and exposure to tobacco billboard advertising), class-level (classroom prevention) and individual-level influences (parents' and friends' smoking behaviour, knowledge of the harmful effects of and exposure to secondhand smoke at home, age, sex and pocket income). RESULTS: Multilevel analyses indicate that 4.5% and 4.2% of the variation in smoking susceptibility is associated with school and class differences, respectively. Students who have parents or friends who smoke, who are exposed to secondhand smoke at home and those who have access to pocket income are found to be more susceptible while greater knowledge of the harmful effects of secondhand smoke appears to diminish susceptibility to smoking. For girls only, billboard tobacco advertising increases the risk of susceptibility and classroom prevention decreases risk while for boys only, attendance at schools with higher prevalence of tobacco use increases risk of susceptibility and anti-smoking media messages decreases risk. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights a number of modifiable factors associated with smoking susceptibility and identifies interactions between teen sex and several factors associated with the susceptibility to smoking. This finding provides support for the call to move beyond gender-blind tobacco control policies. SN - 1468-3318 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18285382/Susceptibility_to_smoking_among_South_East_Asian_youth:_a_multilevel_analysis_ L2 - https://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=18285382 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -