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Cannabinoids in health and disease.
Dialogues Clin Neurosci 2007; 9(4):413-30DC

Abstract

Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millenia. However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s. Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted. Despite the mild addiction to cannabis and the possible enhancement of addiction to other substances of abuse, when combined with cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside. Numerous diseases, such as anorexia, emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease), epilepsy, glaucoma, osteoporosis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and metabolic syndrome-related disorders, to name just a few, are being treated or have the potential to be treated by cannabinoid agonists/antagonists/cannabinoid-related compounds. In view of the very low toxicity and the generally benign side effects of this group of compounds, neglecting or denying their clinical potential is unacceptable--instead, we need to work on the development of more selective cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists and related compounds, as well as on novel drugs of this family with better selectivity, distribution patterns, and pharmacokinetics, and--in cases where it is impossible to separate the desired clinical action and the psychoactivity--just to monitor these side effects carefully.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products Dept, Pharmacy School, Ein-Kerem Medical Campus, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18286801

Citation

Kogan, Natalya M., and Raphael Mechoulam. "Cannabinoids in Health and Disease." Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience, vol. 9, no. 4, 2007, pp. 413-30.
Kogan NM, Mechoulam R. Cannabinoids in health and disease. Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2007;9(4):413-30.
Kogan, N. M., & Mechoulam, R. (2007). Cannabinoids in health and disease. Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience, 9(4), pp. 413-30.
Kogan NM, Mechoulam R. Cannabinoids in Health and Disease. Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2007;9(4):413-30. PubMed PMID: 18286801.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cannabinoids in health and disease. AU - Kogan,Natalya M, AU - Mechoulam,Raphael, PY - 2008/2/22/pubmed PY - 2008/4/12/medline PY - 2008/2/22/entrez SP - 413 EP - 30 JF - Dialogues in clinical neuroscience JO - Dialogues Clin Neurosci VL - 9 IS - 4 N2 - Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millenia. However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s. Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted. Despite the mild addiction to cannabis and the possible enhancement of addiction to other substances of abuse, when combined with cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside. Numerous diseases, such as anorexia, emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease), epilepsy, glaucoma, osteoporosis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and metabolic syndrome-related disorders, to name just a few, are being treated or have the potential to be treated by cannabinoid agonists/antagonists/cannabinoid-related compounds. In view of the very low toxicity and the generally benign side effects of this group of compounds, neglecting or denying their clinical potential is unacceptable--instead, we need to work on the development of more selective cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists and related compounds, as well as on novel drugs of this family with better selectivity, distribution patterns, and pharmacokinetics, and--in cases where it is impossible to separate the desired clinical action and the psychoactivity--just to monitor these side effects carefully. SN - 1294-8322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18286801/Cannabinoids_in_health_and_disease_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/18286801/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -