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Effects of MK-801 and ketamine on short-term memory deficits in passive avoidance step-down task paradigm in mice.
Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 1991 Apr; 13(3):155-9.MF

Abstract

The phenomenon of long-term potentiation (LTP) formation in hippocampal and neocortical brain areas has been suggested as a mechanism for learning and memory where NMDA-receptors play a significant role. Various agonists have been proposed to facilitate LTP and thereby learning and memory. Competitive and non-competitive antagonists of NMDA-receptors block LTP formation and produce attentional or acquisition deficit in animals. A series of experiments were carried out with noncompetitive NMDA antagonists, MK-801 (10-100 micrograms/kg) and ketamine (1-10 mg/kg), in passive avoidance step-down task paradigm in mice. MK-801 showed complete disruption of acquisition at higher doses, while very low doses showed improvement in retention. MK-801 showed additive or potentiating influence on scopolamine-induced deficits. The results of the interaction of NMDA antagonists with scopolamine provide a basis for the speculation that cholinergic- and NMDA-antagonism may play a hand in hand role in short-term memory disturbances in passive avoidance step-down task paradigm in mice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1828849

Citation

Sharma, A C., and S K. Kulkarni. "Effects of MK-801 and Ketamine On Short-term Memory Deficits in Passive Avoidance Step-down Task Paradigm in Mice." Methods and Findings in Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, vol. 13, no. 3, 1991, pp. 155-9.
Sharma AC, Kulkarni SK. Effects of MK-801 and ketamine on short-term memory deficits in passive avoidance step-down task paradigm in mice. Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 1991;13(3):155-9.
Sharma, A. C., & Kulkarni, S. K. (1991). Effects of MK-801 and ketamine on short-term memory deficits in passive avoidance step-down task paradigm in mice. Methods and Findings in Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, 13(3), 155-9.
Sharma AC, Kulkarni SK. Effects of MK-801 and Ketamine On Short-term Memory Deficits in Passive Avoidance Step-down Task Paradigm in Mice. Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 1991;13(3):155-9. PubMed PMID: 1828849.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of MK-801 and ketamine on short-term memory deficits in passive avoidance step-down task paradigm in mice. AU - Sharma,A C, AU - Kulkarni,S K, PY - 1991/4/1/pubmed PY - 1991/4/1/medline PY - 1991/4/1/entrez SP - 155 EP - 9 JF - Methods and findings in experimental and clinical pharmacology JO - Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol VL - 13 IS - 3 N2 - The phenomenon of long-term potentiation (LTP) formation in hippocampal and neocortical brain areas has been suggested as a mechanism for learning and memory where NMDA-receptors play a significant role. Various agonists have been proposed to facilitate LTP and thereby learning and memory. Competitive and non-competitive antagonists of NMDA-receptors block LTP formation and produce attentional or acquisition deficit in animals. A series of experiments were carried out with noncompetitive NMDA antagonists, MK-801 (10-100 micrograms/kg) and ketamine (1-10 mg/kg), in passive avoidance step-down task paradigm in mice. MK-801 showed complete disruption of acquisition at higher doses, while very low doses showed improvement in retention. MK-801 showed additive or potentiating influence on scopolamine-induced deficits. The results of the interaction of NMDA antagonists with scopolamine provide a basis for the speculation that cholinergic- and NMDA-antagonism may play a hand in hand role in short-term memory disturbances in passive avoidance step-down task paradigm in mice. SN - 0379-0355 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1828849/Effects_of_MK_801_and_ketamine_on_short_term_memory_deficits_in_passive_avoidance_step_down_task_paradigm_in_mice_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -