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Significance of alterations in plasma lipid profile levels in breast cancer.
Integr Cancer Ther. 2008 Mar; 7(1):33-41.IC

Abstract

HYPOTHESES

The relationship between lipids and breast cancer is obscure. Until now, conflicting results have been reported on the association between lipids and risk of breast cancer in women. Therefore, the major aim of this study is to examine the role of alterations in lipid profile in breast cancer.

STUDY DESIGN

Plasma lipids (ie, total cholesterol [TC], high-density lipoprotein [HDL], low-density lipoprotein [LDL], very-low-density lipoprotein [VLDL], and triglycerides [TG]) were analyzed from 70 controls, 30 patients with benign breast disease (BBD), 125 untreated breast cancer patients, and 93 posttreatment follow-up samples.

METHODS

Samples were analyzed using highly sensitive and specific spectrophotometric methods.

RESULTS

Plasma TC, LDL, VLDL, and TG were significantly lower (p = .042, p = .003, p = .024, p = .014, respectively) in patients with BBD compared with controls. Plasma TC and HDL were significantly lower (p = .026, p = .0001, respectively), and VLDL and TG were significantly higher (p = .009, p = .05) in breast cancer patients as compared with controls. Plasma VLDL and TG were significantly higher in breast cancer patients as compared with patients with BBD. The receiver-operating characteristic curve showed that plasma TC, LDL, VLDL, and TG levels could significantly discriminate (p = .001, p = .005, p = .005, p = .005, respectively) between controls and patients with BBD. Plasma levels of TC, HDL, VLDL, and TG could significantly distinguish (p = .01, p = .002, p = .001, p = .002, respectively) between controls and breast cancer patients. Plasma levels of VLDL and TG could significantly discriminate (p = .000, p = .000, respectively) between patients with BBD and breast cancer patients. Odds ratio analysis revealed that higher levels of TC and HDL were significantly associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk (p = .01 and p = .0001, respectively), whereas higher levels of VLDL and TG were significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk (p = .001 and p = .002, respectively). Plasma VLDL and TG levels were significantly lower in complete responders as compared with pretreatment levels (p = .000, p = .000, respectively), and plasma TC and LDL levels were significantly lower in nonresponders as compared with pretreatment levels (p = .015, p = .009, respectively).

CONCLUSION

The alterations in lipid profile levels showed a significant correlation with breast cancer risk, disease status, and treatment outcome.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Biochemistry Research Division, The Gujarat Cancer & Research Institute, Asarwa, Ahmedabad, India.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18292593

Citation

Franky Dhaval Shah, , et al. "Significance of Alterations in Plasma Lipid Profile Levels in Breast Cancer." Integrative Cancer Therapies, vol. 7, no. 1, 2008, pp. 33-41.
Franky Dhaval Shah , Shilin Nandubhai Shukla , Pankaj Manubhai Shah , et al. Significance of alterations in plasma lipid profile levels in breast cancer. Integr Cancer Ther. 2008;7(1):33-41.
Franky Dhaval Shah, ., Shilin Nandubhai Shukla, ., Pankaj Manubhai Shah, ., Patel, H. R., & Prabhudas Shankerbhai Patel, . (2008). Significance of alterations in plasma lipid profile levels in breast cancer. Integrative Cancer Therapies, 7(1), 33-41. https://doi.org/10.1177/1534735407313883
Franky Dhaval Shah , et al. Significance of Alterations in Plasma Lipid Profile Levels in Breast Cancer. Integr Cancer Ther. 2008;7(1):33-41. PubMed PMID: 18292593.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Significance of alterations in plasma lipid profile levels in breast cancer. AU - Franky Dhaval Shah,, AU - Shilin Nandubhai Shukla,, AU - Pankaj Manubhai Shah,, AU - Patel,Hiten R H, AU - Prabhudas Shankerbhai Patel,, PY - 2008/2/23/pubmed PY - 2008/5/9/medline PY - 2008/2/23/entrez SP - 33 EP - 41 JF - Integrative cancer therapies JO - Integr Cancer Ther VL - 7 IS - 1 N2 - HYPOTHESES: The relationship between lipids and breast cancer is obscure. Until now, conflicting results have been reported on the association between lipids and risk of breast cancer in women. Therefore, the major aim of this study is to examine the role of alterations in lipid profile in breast cancer. STUDY DESIGN: Plasma lipids (ie, total cholesterol [TC], high-density lipoprotein [HDL], low-density lipoprotein [LDL], very-low-density lipoprotein [VLDL], and triglycerides [TG]) were analyzed from 70 controls, 30 patients with benign breast disease (BBD), 125 untreated breast cancer patients, and 93 posttreatment follow-up samples. METHODS: Samples were analyzed using highly sensitive and specific spectrophotometric methods. RESULTS: Plasma TC, LDL, VLDL, and TG were significantly lower (p = .042, p = .003, p = .024, p = .014, respectively) in patients with BBD compared with controls. Plasma TC and HDL were significantly lower (p = .026, p = .0001, respectively), and VLDL and TG were significantly higher (p = .009, p = .05) in breast cancer patients as compared with controls. Plasma VLDL and TG were significantly higher in breast cancer patients as compared with patients with BBD. The receiver-operating characteristic curve showed that plasma TC, LDL, VLDL, and TG levels could significantly discriminate (p = .001, p = .005, p = .005, p = .005, respectively) between controls and patients with BBD. Plasma levels of TC, HDL, VLDL, and TG could significantly distinguish (p = .01, p = .002, p = .001, p = .002, respectively) between controls and breast cancer patients. Plasma levels of VLDL and TG could significantly discriminate (p = .000, p = .000, respectively) between patients with BBD and breast cancer patients. Odds ratio analysis revealed that higher levels of TC and HDL were significantly associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk (p = .01 and p = .0001, respectively), whereas higher levels of VLDL and TG were significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk (p = .001 and p = .002, respectively). Plasma VLDL and TG levels were significantly lower in complete responders as compared with pretreatment levels (p = .000, p = .000, respectively), and plasma TC and LDL levels were significantly lower in nonresponders as compared with pretreatment levels (p = .015, p = .009, respectively). CONCLUSION: The alterations in lipid profile levels showed a significant correlation with breast cancer risk, disease status, and treatment outcome. SN - 1534-7354 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18292593/Significance_of_alterations_in_plasma_lipid_profile_levels_in_breast_cancer_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1534735407313883?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -