Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Hemoglobin levels and coronary artery disease.
Am Heart J. 2008 Mar; 155(3):494-8.AH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Anemia is a risk factor for adverse cardiovascular disease outcomes. However, there is limited information concerning the association of hemoglobin concentration and new onset of clinically recognized coronary artery disease (CAD).

METHODS

An historical cohort study was conducted with patients from Veterans Affairs medical centers. Baseline hemoglobin determinations were evaluated with respect to CAD using data from records of 25,622 subjects with no known heart disease. Coronary artery disease was identified from a new diagnosis based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, coding or a new prescription for nitroglycerin. Models were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine clearance, and use of statin or beta-blocker.

RESULTS

Among the cohort, 5297 (20.7%) subjects developed CAD over 73,895 person-years of follow-up. Compared with control hemoglobin levels of 15.0 to 17.0 g/dL, the multivariable-adjusted risk of CAD increased with lower hemoglobin levels: an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.47 and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.18 to 1.84 for hemoglobin levels of 9.0 to 11.0 g/dL; an HR of 1.34 and 95% CI of 1.20 to 1.49 for 11.0 to 13.0 g/dL; and an HR of 1.07 and 95% CI of 1.01 to 1.13 for 13.0 to 15.0 g/dL. Hemoglobin levels > or = 17.0 g/dL were also associated with increased risk for CAD (adjusted HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.08-1.37).

CONCLUSIONS

Hemoglobin levels > or = 17 or < 15 g/dL are independently associated with increase risk for new cardiac events.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, Denver, CO 80262, USA. michel.chonchol@uchsc.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18294483

Citation

Chonchol, Michel, and Christopher Nielson. "Hemoglobin Levels and Coronary Artery Disease." American Heart Journal, vol. 155, no. 3, 2008, pp. 494-8.
Chonchol M, Nielson C. Hemoglobin levels and coronary artery disease. Am Heart J. 2008;155(3):494-8.
Chonchol, M., & Nielson, C. (2008). Hemoglobin levels and coronary artery disease. American Heart Journal, 155(3), 494-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2007.10.031
Chonchol M, Nielson C. Hemoglobin Levels and Coronary Artery Disease. Am Heart J. 2008;155(3):494-8. PubMed PMID: 18294483.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hemoglobin levels and coronary artery disease. AU - Chonchol,Michel, AU - Nielson,Christopher, PY - 2007/06/22/received PY - 2007/10/24/accepted PY - 2008/2/26/pubmed PY - 2008/3/14/medline PY - 2008/2/26/entrez SP - 494 EP - 8 JF - American heart journal JO - Am Heart J VL - 155 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Anemia is a risk factor for adverse cardiovascular disease outcomes. However, there is limited information concerning the association of hemoglobin concentration and new onset of clinically recognized coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS: An historical cohort study was conducted with patients from Veterans Affairs medical centers. Baseline hemoglobin determinations were evaluated with respect to CAD using data from records of 25,622 subjects with no known heart disease. Coronary artery disease was identified from a new diagnosis based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, coding or a new prescription for nitroglycerin. Models were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine clearance, and use of statin or beta-blocker. RESULTS: Among the cohort, 5297 (20.7%) subjects developed CAD over 73,895 person-years of follow-up. Compared with control hemoglobin levels of 15.0 to 17.0 g/dL, the multivariable-adjusted risk of CAD increased with lower hemoglobin levels: an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.47 and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.18 to 1.84 for hemoglobin levels of 9.0 to 11.0 g/dL; an HR of 1.34 and 95% CI of 1.20 to 1.49 for 11.0 to 13.0 g/dL; and an HR of 1.07 and 95% CI of 1.01 to 1.13 for 13.0 to 15.0 g/dL. Hemoglobin levels > or = 17.0 g/dL were also associated with increased risk for CAD (adjusted HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.08-1.37). CONCLUSIONS: Hemoglobin levels > or = 17 or < 15 g/dL are independently associated with increase risk for new cardiac events. SN - 1097-6744 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18294483/Hemoglobin_levels_and_coronary_artery_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8703(07)00864-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -