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Comparison of early phase adaptations for traditional strength and endurance, and low velocity resistance training programs in college-aged women.
J Strength Cond Res. 2008 Jan; 22(1):119-27.JS

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a six-week (16-17 training sessions) low velocity resistance training program (LV) on various performance measures as compared to a traditional strength (TS) and a traditional muscular endurance (TE) resistance training program. Thirty-four healthy adult females (21.1 +/- 2.7 y) were randomly divided into 4 groups: control (C), TS, TE, and LV. Workouts consisted of 3 exercises: leg press (LP), back squat (SQ), and knee extension (KE). Each subject was pre- and posttested for 1 repetition maximum (1RM), muscular endurance, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), muscular power, and body composition. After the pretesting, TS, TE, and LV groups attended a minimum of 16 out of 17 training sessions in which the LP, SQ, and KE were performed to fatigue for each of 3 sets. For each training session, TS trained at 6-10 RM and TE trained at 20-30 RM both with 1-2 second concentric/1-2 second eccentric; and LV trained at 6-10 RM, with 10 second concentric/4 s eccentric. Statistical significance was determined at an alpha level of 0.05. LV increased relative LP and KE 1 RM, but the percent increase was smaller than TS, and not different from C in the SQ. For muscular endurance, LV improved similarly to TE for LP and less than TS and TE for KE. Body composition improved for all groups including C (significant main effect). In conclusion, muscular strength improved with LV training however, TS showed a larger improvement. Muscular endurance improved with LV training, but not above what TE or TS demonstrated. For all other variables, there were no significant improvements for LV beyond what C demonstrated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Recreation and Sport Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, USA. rana@ohio.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18296964

Citation

Rana, Sharon R., et al. "Comparison of Early Phase Adaptations for Traditional Strength and Endurance, and Low Velocity Resistance Training Programs in College-aged Women." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 22, no. 1, 2008, pp. 119-27.
Rana SR, Chleboun GS, Gilders RM, et al. Comparison of early phase adaptations for traditional strength and endurance, and low velocity resistance training programs in college-aged women. J Strength Cond Res. 2008;22(1):119-27.
Rana, S. R., Chleboun, G. S., Gilders, R. M., Hagerman, F. C., Herman, J. R., Hikida, R. S., Kushnick, M. R., Staron, R. S., & Toma, K. (2008). Comparison of early phase adaptations for traditional strength and endurance, and low velocity resistance training programs in college-aged women. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 22(1), 119-27. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e31815f30e7
Rana SR, et al. Comparison of Early Phase Adaptations for Traditional Strength and Endurance, and Low Velocity Resistance Training Programs in College-aged Women. J Strength Cond Res. 2008;22(1):119-27. PubMed PMID: 18296964.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of early phase adaptations for traditional strength and endurance, and low velocity resistance training programs in college-aged women. AU - Rana,Sharon R, AU - Chleboun,Gary S, AU - Gilders,Roger M, AU - Hagerman,Fredrick C, AU - Herman,Jennifer R, AU - Hikida,Robert S, AU - Kushnick,Michael R, AU - Staron,Robert S, AU - Toma,Kumika, PY - 2008/2/26/pubmed PY - 2008/4/9/medline PY - 2008/2/26/entrez SP - 119 EP - 27 JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a six-week (16-17 training sessions) low velocity resistance training program (LV) on various performance measures as compared to a traditional strength (TS) and a traditional muscular endurance (TE) resistance training program. Thirty-four healthy adult females (21.1 +/- 2.7 y) were randomly divided into 4 groups: control (C), TS, TE, and LV. Workouts consisted of 3 exercises: leg press (LP), back squat (SQ), and knee extension (KE). Each subject was pre- and posttested for 1 repetition maximum (1RM), muscular endurance, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), muscular power, and body composition. After the pretesting, TS, TE, and LV groups attended a minimum of 16 out of 17 training sessions in which the LP, SQ, and KE were performed to fatigue for each of 3 sets. For each training session, TS trained at 6-10 RM and TE trained at 20-30 RM both with 1-2 second concentric/1-2 second eccentric; and LV trained at 6-10 RM, with 10 second concentric/4 s eccentric. Statistical significance was determined at an alpha level of 0.05. LV increased relative LP and KE 1 RM, but the percent increase was smaller than TS, and not different from C in the SQ. For muscular endurance, LV improved similarly to TE for LP and less than TS and TE for KE. Body composition improved for all groups including C (significant main effect). In conclusion, muscular strength improved with LV training however, TS showed a larger improvement. Muscular endurance improved with LV training, but not above what TE or TS demonstrated. For all other variables, there were no significant improvements for LV beyond what C demonstrated. SN - 1533-4287 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18296964/Comparison_of_early_phase_adaptations_for_traditional_strength_and_endurance_and_low_velocity_resistance_training_programs_in_college_aged_women_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=18296964.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -