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Polyphenols and antioxidant properties of almond skins: influence of industrial processing.
J Food Sci. 2008 Mar; 73(2):C106-15.JF

Abstract

Almond (Prunus dulcis[Mill.] D.A. Webb) skins have been proposed as a source of bioactive polyphenols. In this article, the phenolic composition and antioxidant activity of almond skins obtained from different processes (blanching [freeze-drying], blanching + drying, and roasting) were studied. A total of 31 phenolic compounds corresponding to flavan-3-ols (33% to 56% of the total of phenolic compounds identified), flavonol glycosides (9% to 36%), hydroxybenzoic acids and aldehydes (6% to 26%), flavonol aglycones (1.7% to 18%), flavanone glycosides (3% to 7.7%), flavanone aglycones (0.69% to 5.4%), hydroxycinnamic acids (0.65% to 2.6%), and dihydroflavonol aglycones (0% to 2.8%) were determined in the skins from 3 different varieties of almonds. The total contents of phenolic compounds identified were significantly (P < 0.05) higher (around 2-fold) in the roasted samples than in the blanched almonds (freeze-dried). Industrial drying (oven drying) of the blanched almond skins produced an increase (< 2-fold) in the contents of phenolic compounds, although the results were only statistically significant (P < 0.05) for some samples. The antioxidant activity (ORAC values) was higher for the roasted samples (0.803 to 1.08 mmol Trolox/g), followed by the samples subjected to blanching + drying (0.398 to 0.575 mmol Trolox/g) and then the blanched (freeze-dried) samples (0.331 to 0.451 mmol Trolox/g). Roasting is the most suitable type of industrial processing of almonds to obtain almond skin extracts with the greatest antioxidant capacity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Inst. de Fermentaciones Industriales (CSIC), Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18298714

Citation

Garrido, I, et al. "Polyphenols and Antioxidant Properties of Almond Skins: Influence of Industrial Processing." Journal of Food Science, vol. 73, no. 2, 2008, pp. C106-15.
Garrido I, Monagas M, Gómez-Cordovés C, et al. Polyphenols and antioxidant properties of almond skins: influence of industrial processing. J Food Sci. 2008;73(2):C106-15.
Garrido, I., Monagas, M., Gómez-Cordovés, C., & Bartolomé, B. (2008). Polyphenols and antioxidant properties of almond skins: influence of industrial processing. Journal of Food Science, 73(2), C106-15. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2007.00637.x
Garrido I, et al. Polyphenols and Antioxidant Properties of Almond Skins: Influence of Industrial Processing. J Food Sci. 2008;73(2):C106-15. PubMed PMID: 18298714.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Polyphenols and antioxidant properties of almond skins: influence of industrial processing. AU - Garrido,I, AU - Monagas,M, AU - Gómez-Cordovés,C, AU - Bartolomé,B, PY - 2008/2/27/pubmed PY - 2008/3/29/medline PY - 2008/2/27/entrez SP - C106 EP - 15 JF - Journal of food science JO - J Food Sci VL - 73 IS - 2 N2 - Almond (Prunus dulcis[Mill.] D.A. Webb) skins have been proposed as a source of bioactive polyphenols. In this article, the phenolic composition and antioxidant activity of almond skins obtained from different processes (blanching [freeze-drying], blanching + drying, and roasting) were studied. A total of 31 phenolic compounds corresponding to flavan-3-ols (33% to 56% of the total of phenolic compounds identified), flavonol glycosides (9% to 36%), hydroxybenzoic acids and aldehydes (6% to 26%), flavonol aglycones (1.7% to 18%), flavanone glycosides (3% to 7.7%), flavanone aglycones (0.69% to 5.4%), hydroxycinnamic acids (0.65% to 2.6%), and dihydroflavonol aglycones (0% to 2.8%) were determined in the skins from 3 different varieties of almonds. The total contents of phenolic compounds identified were significantly (P < 0.05) higher (around 2-fold) in the roasted samples than in the blanched almonds (freeze-dried). Industrial drying (oven drying) of the blanched almond skins produced an increase (< 2-fold) in the contents of phenolic compounds, although the results were only statistically significant (P < 0.05) for some samples. The antioxidant activity (ORAC values) was higher for the roasted samples (0.803 to 1.08 mmol Trolox/g), followed by the samples subjected to blanching + drying (0.398 to 0.575 mmol Trolox/g) and then the blanched (freeze-dried) samples (0.331 to 0.451 mmol Trolox/g). Roasting is the most suitable type of industrial processing of almonds to obtain almond skin extracts with the greatest antioxidant capacity. SN - 1750-3841 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18298714/Polyphenols_and_antioxidant_properties_of_almond_skins:_influence_of_industrial_processing_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -