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Autoimmune disease concomitance among inflammatory bowel disease patients in the United States, 2001-2002.
Inflamm Bowel Dis 2008; 14(6):738-43IB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recent studies suggest that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may share an underlying pathogenesis with other autoimmune diseases.

METHODS

Two United States data sets with patient-level medical and drug claims were used to explore the occurrence of autoimmune diseases in patients with IBD, particularly Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), with that in controls. From 2001 to 2002 IBD patients were identified using International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, diagnosis codes in the IMS Health Integrated Administration Claims Database and the Market Scan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database. Controls were selected by matching on sex, age, Census Bureau region, and length of previous medical insurance coverage. Odds ratios (ORs) evaluated the risk relationship between IBD patients and controls within an estimated Mantel-Haenszel 95% confidence interval. Sensitivity analysis tested the case identification method used to select IBD patients.

RESULTS

The risk for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) was substantially increased across both data sets: OR (95% confidence interval [CI]) of 7.8 (5.6-10.8) in IMS Health and 5.8 (3.9-8.6) in MarketScan. The risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was 2.7 (2.4-3.0) and 2.1 (1.8-2.3), respectively; for multiple sclerosis (MS); the ORs were 1.5 (1.2-1.9) and 1.6 (1.2-2.1), respectively. There was no increased risk for type 1 diabetes mellitus, and the results for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) were inconsistent. The sensitivity analysis supported these findings.

CONCLUSIONS

A much higher risk for RA, AS, PsA, and MS was observed in IBD patients compared with controls. Prospective epidemiologic studies are needed to confirm these findings and explore the pathogenic mechanism of this relationship.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Chicago Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18300281

Citation

Cohen, Russell, et al. "Autoimmune Disease Concomitance Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in the United States, 2001-2002." Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, vol. 14, no. 6, 2008, pp. 738-43.
Cohen R, Robinson D, Paramore C, et al. Autoimmune disease concomitance among inflammatory bowel disease patients in the United States, 2001-2002. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2008;14(6):738-43.
Cohen, R., Robinson, D., Paramore, C., Fraeman, K., Renahan, K., & Bala, M. (2008). Autoimmune disease concomitance among inflammatory bowel disease patients in the United States, 2001-2002. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 14(6), pp. 738-43. doi:10.1002/ibd.20406.
Cohen R, et al. Autoimmune Disease Concomitance Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in the United States, 2001-2002. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2008;14(6):738-43. PubMed PMID: 18300281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Autoimmune disease concomitance among inflammatory bowel disease patients in the United States, 2001-2002. AU - Cohen,Russell, AU - Robinson,Don,Jr AU - Paramore,Clark, AU - Fraeman,Kathy, AU - Renahan,Kevin, AU - Bala,Mohan, PY - 2008/2/27/pubmed PY - 2008/9/27/medline PY - 2008/2/27/entrez SP - 738 EP - 43 JF - Inflammatory bowel diseases JO - Inflamm. Bowel Dis. VL - 14 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may share an underlying pathogenesis with other autoimmune diseases. METHODS: Two United States data sets with patient-level medical and drug claims were used to explore the occurrence of autoimmune diseases in patients with IBD, particularly Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), with that in controls. From 2001 to 2002 IBD patients were identified using International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, diagnosis codes in the IMS Health Integrated Administration Claims Database and the Market Scan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database. Controls were selected by matching on sex, age, Census Bureau region, and length of previous medical insurance coverage. Odds ratios (ORs) evaluated the risk relationship between IBD patients and controls within an estimated Mantel-Haenszel 95% confidence interval. Sensitivity analysis tested the case identification method used to select IBD patients. RESULTS: The risk for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) was substantially increased across both data sets: OR (95% confidence interval [CI]) of 7.8 (5.6-10.8) in IMS Health and 5.8 (3.9-8.6) in MarketScan. The risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was 2.7 (2.4-3.0) and 2.1 (1.8-2.3), respectively; for multiple sclerosis (MS); the ORs were 1.5 (1.2-1.9) and 1.6 (1.2-2.1), respectively. There was no increased risk for type 1 diabetes mellitus, and the results for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) were inconsistent. The sensitivity analysis supported these findings. CONCLUSIONS: A much higher risk for RA, AS, PsA, and MS was observed in IBD patients compared with controls. Prospective epidemiologic studies are needed to confirm these findings and explore the pathogenic mechanism of this relationship. SN - 1078-0998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18300281/Autoimmune_disease_concomitance_among_inflammatory_bowel_disease_patients_in_the_United_States_2001_2002_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=18300281 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -