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Weight cycling and risk of forearm fractures: a 28-year follow-up of men in the Oslo Study.
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr 15; 167(8):1005-13.AJ

Abstract

Weight cycling may lead to fractures in non-weight-bearing bone. The authors investigated the association between self-reported episodes of weight loss and forearm fracture in a cohort of elderly Norwegian men (n = 4,601; mean age = 71.6 years). Men initially examined in 1972-1973 as part of the population-based Oslo Study were reexamined in 2000. Weight and height were measured both times; histories of weight cycling (amount and frequency) and fracture and information on covariates were elicited by questionnaire. Irrespective of amount of weight loss, 35-43% of men reporting four or more weight loss episodes at ages 25-50 years had experienced a forearm fracture, as compared with 17-18% of men without weight loss episodes. For weight loss episodes that had occurred after age 50 years, associations were weaker. In an analysis limited to men whose last fracture had occurred after the weight loss episodes, the adjusted odds ratio for forearm fracture was 2.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.10, 7.64) for four or more weight loss episodes versus none. These findings suggest that weight cycling may predict forearm fracture in elderly men and indicate that the potentially harmful effects of weight cycling are related to the number of episodes occurring at ages 25-50 years.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. anne.johanne.sogaard@fhi.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18303007

Citation

Søgaard, Anne Johanne, et al. "Weight Cycling and Risk of Forearm Fractures: a 28-year Follow-up of Men in the Oslo Study." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 167, no. 8, 2008, pp. 1005-13.
Søgaard AJ, Meyer HE, Tonstad S, et al. Weight cycling and risk of forearm fractures: a 28-year follow-up of men in the Oslo Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2008;167(8):1005-13.
Søgaard, A. J., Meyer, H. E., Tonstad, S., Håheim, L. L., & Holme, I. (2008). Weight cycling and risk of forearm fractures: a 28-year follow-up of men in the Oslo Study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 167(8), 1005-13. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwm384
Søgaard AJ, et al. Weight Cycling and Risk of Forearm Fractures: a 28-year Follow-up of Men in the Oslo Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr 15;167(8):1005-13. PubMed PMID: 18303007.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Weight cycling and risk of forearm fractures: a 28-year follow-up of men in the Oslo Study. AU - Søgaard,Anne Johanne, AU - Meyer,Haakon E, AU - Tonstad,Serena, AU - Håheim,Lise Lund, AU - Holme,Ingar, Y1 - 2008/02/25/ PY - 2008/2/28/pubmed PY - 2008/5/16/medline PY - 2008/2/28/entrez SP - 1005 EP - 13 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 167 IS - 8 N2 - Weight cycling may lead to fractures in non-weight-bearing bone. The authors investigated the association between self-reported episodes of weight loss and forearm fracture in a cohort of elderly Norwegian men (n = 4,601; mean age = 71.6 years). Men initially examined in 1972-1973 as part of the population-based Oslo Study were reexamined in 2000. Weight and height were measured both times; histories of weight cycling (amount and frequency) and fracture and information on covariates were elicited by questionnaire. Irrespective of amount of weight loss, 35-43% of men reporting four or more weight loss episodes at ages 25-50 years had experienced a forearm fracture, as compared with 17-18% of men without weight loss episodes. For weight loss episodes that had occurred after age 50 years, associations were weaker. In an analysis limited to men whose last fracture had occurred after the weight loss episodes, the adjusted odds ratio for forearm fracture was 2.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.10, 7.64) for four or more weight loss episodes versus none. These findings suggest that weight cycling may predict forearm fracture in elderly men and indicate that the potentially harmful effects of weight cycling are related to the number of episodes occurring at ages 25-50 years. SN - 1476-6256 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18303007/Weight_cycling_and_risk_of_forearm_fractures:_a_28_year_follow_up_of_men_in_the_Oslo_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwm384 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -