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Food safety in the domestic environment: the effect of consumer risk information on human disease risks.
Risk Anal. 2008 Feb; 28(1):179-92.RA

Abstract

The improvement of food safety in the domestic environment requires a transdisciplinary approach, involving interaction between both the social and natural sciences. This approach is applied in a study on risks associated with Campylobacter on broiler meat. First, some web-based information interventions were designed and tested on participant motivation and intentions to cook more safely. Based on these self-reported measures, the intervention supported by the emotion "disgust" was selected as the most promising information intervention. Its effect on microbial cross-contamination was tested by recruiting a set of participants who prepared a salad with chicken breast fillet carrying a known amount of tracer bacteria. The amount of tracer that could be recovered from the salad revealed the transfer and survival of Campylobacter and was used as a measure of hygiene. This was introduced into an existing risk model on Campylobacter in the Netherlands to assess the effect of the information intervention both at the level of exposure and the level of human disease risk. We showed that the information intervention supported by the emotion "disgust" alone had no measurable effect on the health risk. However, when a behavioral cue was embedded within the instruction for the salad preparation, the risk decreased sharply. It is shown that a transdisciplinary approach, involving research on risk perception, microbiology, and risk assessment, is successful in evaluating the efficacy of an information intervention in terms of human health risks. The approach offers a novel tool for science-based risk management in the area of food safety.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory for Zoonoses and Environmental Microbiology, Centre of Infectious Disease Control Netherlands, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RVIM), bilthoven, The Netherlands. maarten.nauta@rivm.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18304115

Citation

Nauta, Maarten J., et al. "Food Safety in the Domestic Environment: the Effect of Consumer Risk Information On Human Disease Risks." Risk Analysis : an Official Publication of the Society for Risk Analysis, vol. 28, no. 1, 2008, pp. 179-92.
Nauta MJ, Fischer AR, van Asselt ED, et al. Food safety in the domestic environment: the effect of consumer risk information on human disease risks. Risk Anal. 2008;28(1):179-92.
Nauta, M. J., Fischer, A. R., van Asselt, E. D., de Jong, A. E., Frewer, L. J., & de Jonge, R. (2008). Food safety in the domestic environment: the effect of consumer risk information on human disease risks. Risk Analysis : an Official Publication of the Society for Risk Analysis, 28(1), 179-92. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1539-6924.2008.01012.x
Nauta MJ, et al. Food Safety in the Domestic Environment: the Effect of Consumer Risk Information On Human Disease Risks. Risk Anal. 2008;28(1):179-92. PubMed PMID: 18304115.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food safety in the domestic environment: the effect of consumer risk information on human disease risks. AU - Nauta,Maarten J, AU - Fischer,Arnout R H, AU - van Asselt,Esther D, AU - de Jong,Aarieke E I, AU - Frewer,Lynn J, AU - de Jonge,Rob, PY - 2008/2/29/pubmed PY - 2008/8/7/medline PY - 2008/2/29/entrez SP - 179 EP - 92 JF - Risk analysis : an official publication of the Society for Risk Analysis JO - Risk Anal VL - 28 IS - 1 N2 - The improvement of food safety in the domestic environment requires a transdisciplinary approach, involving interaction between both the social and natural sciences. This approach is applied in a study on risks associated with Campylobacter on broiler meat. First, some web-based information interventions were designed and tested on participant motivation and intentions to cook more safely. Based on these self-reported measures, the intervention supported by the emotion "disgust" was selected as the most promising information intervention. Its effect on microbial cross-contamination was tested by recruiting a set of participants who prepared a salad with chicken breast fillet carrying a known amount of tracer bacteria. The amount of tracer that could be recovered from the salad revealed the transfer and survival of Campylobacter and was used as a measure of hygiene. This was introduced into an existing risk model on Campylobacter in the Netherlands to assess the effect of the information intervention both at the level of exposure and the level of human disease risk. We showed that the information intervention supported by the emotion "disgust" alone had no measurable effect on the health risk. However, when a behavioral cue was embedded within the instruction for the salad preparation, the risk decreased sharply. It is shown that a transdisciplinary approach, involving research on risk perception, microbiology, and risk assessment, is successful in evaluating the efficacy of an information intervention in terms of human health risks. The approach offers a novel tool for science-based risk management in the area of food safety. SN - 1539-6924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18304115/Food_safety_in_the_domestic_environment:_the_effect_of_consumer_risk_information_on_human_disease_risks_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -