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Dorsal hippocampus involvement in delay fear conditioning depends upon the strength of the tone-footshock association.
Hippocampus. 2008; 18(7):640-54.H

Abstract

The hippocampus is important for the formation of spatial, contextual, and episodic memories. For instance, lesions of the dorsal hippocampus (DH) produce demonstrable deficits in contextual fear conditioning. By contrast, it is generally agreed that the DH is not important for conditioning to a discrete cue (such as a tone or light) that is paired with footshock in a temporally contiguous fashion (delay conditioning). There are, however, some reports of hippocampus involvement in delay conditioning. The present series of experiments was designed to assess the conditions under which the hippocampus-dependent component of delay fear conditioning performance may be revealed. Here, we manipulated the number of conditioning trials and the intensity of the footshock in order to vary the strength of conditioning. The results indicate that the DH contributes to freezing performance to a delay conditioned tone when the conditioning parameters are relatively weak (few trials or low footshock intensity), but not when strong parameters are used. The results are discussed in terms of two parallel memory systems: a direct tone-footshock association that is independent of the hippocampus and a hippocampus-dependent memory for the conditioning session.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology and Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18306286

Citation

Quinn, Jennifer J., et al. "Dorsal Hippocampus Involvement in Delay Fear Conditioning Depends Upon the Strength of the Tone-footshock Association." Hippocampus, vol. 18, no. 7, 2008, pp. 640-54.
Quinn JJ, Wied HM, Ma QD, et al. Dorsal hippocampus involvement in delay fear conditioning depends upon the strength of the tone-footshock association. Hippocampus. 2008;18(7):640-54.
Quinn, J. J., Wied, H. M., Ma, Q. D., Tinsley, M. R., & Fanselow, M. S. (2008). Dorsal hippocampus involvement in delay fear conditioning depends upon the strength of the tone-footshock association. Hippocampus, 18(7), 640-54. https://doi.org/10.1002/hipo.20424
Quinn JJ, et al. Dorsal Hippocampus Involvement in Delay Fear Conditioning Depends Upon the Strength of the Tone-footshock Association. Hippocampus. 2008;18(7):640-54. PubMed PMID: 18306286.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dorsal hippocampus involvement in delay fear conditioning depends upon the strength of the tone-footshock association. AU - Quinn,Jennifer J, AU - Wied,Heather M, AU - Ma,Quang D, AU - Tinsley,Matthew R, AU - Fanselow,Michael S, PY - 2008/2/29/pubmed PY - 2008/8/21/medline PY - 2008/2/29/entrez SP - 640 EP - 54 JF - Hippocampus JO - Hippocampus VL - 18 IS - 7 N2 - The hippocampus is important for the formation of spatial, contextual, and episodic memories. For instance, lesions of the dorsal hippocampus (DH) produce demonstrable deficits in contextual fear conditioning. By contrast, it is generally agreed that the DH is not important for conditioning to a discrete cue (such as a tone or light) that is paired with footshock in a temporally contiguous fashion (delay conditioning). There are, however, some reports of hippocampus involvement in delay conditioning. The present series of experiments was designed to assess the conditions under which the hippocampus-dependent component of delay fear conditioning performance may be revealed. Here, we manipulated the number of conditioning trials and the intensity of the footshock in order to vary the strength of conditioning. The results indicate that the DH contributes to freezing performance to a delay conditioned tone when the conditioning parameters are relatively weak (few trials or low footshock intensity), but not when strong parameters are used. The results are discussed in terms of two parallel memory systems: a direct tone-footshock association that is independent of the hippocampus and a hippocampus-dependent memory for the conditioning session. SN - 1098-1063 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18306286/Dorsal_hippocampus_involvement_in_delay_fear_conditioning_depends_upon_the_strength_of_the_tone_footshock_association_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/hipo.20424 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -