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Intrauterine risk factors for precocious atherosclerosis.
Pediatrics 2008; 121(3):570-4Ped

Abstract

Evidence from noninvasive ultrasound studies of the neonatal aorta and fetal and early childhood postmortem studies indicates that impaired fetal growth, in utero exposure to maternal hypercholesterolemia, and diabetic macrosomia may all be important risk factors for vascular changes consistent with the earliest physical signs of atherosclerosis. Although the exact mechanisms that underlie these associations remain unclear, animal models have suggested that the use of antioxidant, lipid-lowering, and other innovative therapies may counteract the impact of these intrauterine risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes the current evidence for intrauterine factors that have a direct impact on atherosclerosis and provides potential treatment and prevention strategies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Nutrition Research Centre, Université Claude Bernard, Lyon, France. michael.skilton@baker.edu.au

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18310207

Citation

Skilton, Michael R.. "Intrauterine Risk Factors for Precocious Atherosclerosis." Pediatrics, vol. 121, no. 3, 2008, pp. 570-4.
Skilton MR. Intrauterine risk factors for precocious atherosclerosis. Pediatrics. 2008;121(3):570-4.
Skilton, M. R. (2008). Intrauterine risk factors for precocious atherosclerosis. Pediatrics, 121(3), pp. 570-4. doi:10.1542/peds.2007-1801.
Skilton MR. Intrauterine Risk Factors for Precocious Atherosclerosis. Pediatrics. 2008;121(3):570-4. PubMed PMID: 18310207.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intrauterine risk factors for precocious atherosclerosis. A1 - Skilton,Michael R, PY - 2008/3/4/pubmed PY - 2008/3/21/medline PY - 2008/3/4/entrez SP - 570 EP - 4 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 121 IS - 3 N2 - Evidence from noninvasive ultrasound studies of the neonatal aorta and fetal and early childhood postmortem studies indicates that impaired fetal growth, in utero exposure to maternal hypercholesterolemia, and diabetic macrosomia may all be important risk factors for vascular changes consistent with the earliest physical signs of atherosclerosis. Although the exact mechanisms that underlie these associations remain unclear, animal models have suggested that the use of antioxidant, lipid-lowering, and other innovative therapies may counteract the impact of these intrauterine risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes the current evidence for intrauterine factors that have a direct impact on atherosclerosis and provides potential treatment and prevention strategies. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18310207/full_citation L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=18310207 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -