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Long-term management of facial atopic eczema with pimecrolimus cream 1% in paediatric patients with mild to moderate disease.
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2008 Jun; 22(6):718-21.JE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The aim of this post hoc analysis was to evaluate whether treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) with pimecrolimus cream 1% can decrease the development of flares necessitating the use of a topical corticosteroid on the face and thus reduce the need for use of topical corticosteroids in this sensitive skin area.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

In a controlled, double-blind, multicentre study, 140 patients, aged 2 to 17 years, with facial involvement and mild to moderate disease after treatment of the initial flare with prednicarbate 0.25% cream were randomized to an intermittent treatment with pimecrolimus cream 1% twice daily or vehicle for 24 weeks. If a flare occurred, defined as an exacerbation (unacceptable severity of itching/scratching or onset of oozing) not controlled by study medication, patients were treated with prednicarbate 0.25% cream instead.

RESULTS

Patients in the vehicle group needed prednicarbate treatment on the face on 20.7% of the days vs. 11.7% of the study days in the pimecrolimus group (P = 0.0024). Fifty per cent of patients in the pimecrolimus group had no flare on the face during the treatment period compared with 37.5% of patients in the vehicle group (P = 0.012). The median time to first flare in pimecrolimus-treated patients was twice as long as in patients receiving vehicle (138 vs. 68 days, P = 0.01). Three adverse events (one case of skin burning) suspected to be related to use of the study medication were reported for three patients (3.9%) in the pimecrolimus group.

CONCLUSION

Long-term intermittent treatment of facial AD in children and adolescents with pimecrolimus cream 1% does significantly reduce the need for topical corticosteroids.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Allergy-Centre-Charité, Berlin, Germany. torsten.zuberbier@charite.deNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18312323

Citation

Zuberbier, T, and M Bräutigam. "Long-term Management of Facial Atopic Eczema With Pimecrolimus Cream 1% in Paediatric Patients With Mild to Moderate Disease." Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV, vol. 22, no. 6, 2008, pp. 718-21.
Zuberbier T, Bräutigam M. Long-term management of facial atopic eczema with pimecrolimus cream 1% in paediatric patients with mild to moderate disease. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2008;22(6):718-21.
Zuberbier, T., & Bräutigam, M. (2008). Long-term management of facial atopic eczema with pimecrolimus cream 1% in paediatric patients with mild to moderate disease. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV, 22(6), 718-21. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-3083.2008.02586.x
Zuberbier T, Bräutigam M. Long-term Management of Facial Atopic Eczema With Pimecrolimus Cream 1% in Paediatric Patients With Mild to Moderate Disease. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2008;22(6):718-21. PubMed PMID: 18312323.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term management of facial atopic eczema with pimecrolimus cream 1% in paediatric patients with mild to moderate disease. AU - Zuberbier,T, AU - Bräutigam,M, Y1 - 2008/02/26/ PY - 2008/3/4/pubmed PY - 2008/8/12/medline PY - 2008/3/4/entrez SP - 718 EP - 21 JF - Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV JO - J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol VL - 22 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The aim of this post hoc analysis was to evaluate whether treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) with pimecrolimus cream 1% can decrease the development of flares necessitating the use of a topical corticosteroid on the face and thus reduce the need for use of topical corticosteroids in this sensitive skin area. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a controlled, double-blind, multicentre study, 140 patients, aged 2 to 17 years, with facial involvement and mild to moderate disease after treatment of the initial flare with prednicarbate 0.25% cream were randomized to an intermittent treatment with pimecrolimus cream 1% twice daily or vehicle for 24 weeks. If a flare occurred, defined as an exacerbation (unacceptable severity of itching/scratching or onset of oozing) not controlled by study medication, patients were treated with prednicarbate 0.25% cream instead. RESULTS: Patients in the vehicle group needed prednicarbate treatment on the face on 20.7% of the days vs. 11.7% of the study days in the pimecrolimus group (P = 0.0024). Fifty per cent of patients in the pimecrolimus group had no flare on the face during the treatment period compared with 37.5% of patients in the vehicle group (P = 0.012). The median time to first flare in pimecrolimus-treated patients was twice as long as in patients receiving vehicle (138 vs. 68 days, P = 0.01). Three adverse events (one case of skin burning) suspected to be related to use of the study medication were reported for three patients (3.9%) in the pimecrolimus group. CONCLUSION: Long-term intermittent treatment of facial AD in children and adolescents with pimecrolimus cream 1% does significantly reduce the need for topical corticosteroids. SN - 1468-3083 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18312323/Long_term_management_of_facial_atopic_eczema_with_pimecrolimus_cream_1_in_paediatric_patients_with_mild_to_moderate_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-3083.2008.02586.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -