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Relative validity of the Iowa Fluoride Study targeted nutrient semi-quantitative questionnaire and the block kids' food questionnaire for estimating beverage, calcium, and vitamin D intakes by children.
J Am Diet Assoc 2008; 108(3):465-72JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Food frequency questionnaires are commonly developed and subsequently used to investigate relationships between dietary intake and disease outcomes; such tools should be validated in the population of interest. We investigated the relative validities of the Iowa Fluoride Study targeted nutrient semi-quantitative questionnaire and Block Kids' Food Questionnaire in assessing beverage, calcium, and vitamin D intakes using 3-day diaries for reference.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional.

SUBJECTS

Children who completed Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaire at age 9.0+/-0.7 years (n=223) and/or the Block Kids' Food Questionnaire at age 8.3+/-0.3 years (n=129) and 3-day diaries during similar time periods.

MAIN OUTCOMES

Intakes of beverages, calcium, and vitamin D.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES

Spearman correlation coefficients, weighted kappa statistics, and percentages of exact agreement were used to estimate relative validities.

RESULTS

Correlations between milk intakes (r=0.572) reported on diaries and the Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaires were higher than correlations for 100% juice, juice drinks, soda pop, and water (r=0.252 to 0.379). Correlations between milk intakes (r=0.571) and 100% juice intakes (r=0.550) reported on diaries and Block Kids' Food Questionnaires were higher than correlations for other beverages (r=0.223 to 0.326). Correlations with diaries for calcium (r=0.462) and vitamin D (r=0.487) intakes reported on Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaires were similar to correlations with diaries for calcium (r=0.515) and vitamin D (r=0.512) reported on Block Kids' Food Questionnaires. Weighted kappa statistics were similar between the Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaires and the Block Kids' Food Questionnaires for milk, 100% juice, and vitamin D, but were higher on the Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaires than on the Block Kids' Food Questionnaires for calcium. Percentages of exact agreement were higher for calcium, but lower for vitamin D for intakes reported on the Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaires compared to the Block Kids' Food Questionnaires relative to diaries.

CONCLUSIONS

Both the Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaire and the Block Kids' Food Questionnaire provide reasonable estimates of milk, calcium, and vitamin D intakes when compared to 3-day diaries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, University of Iowa College of Dentistry, N335 Dental Science Bldg, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA. teresa-marshall@uiowa.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Validation Studies

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18313429

Citation

Marshall, Teresa A., et al. "Relative Validity of the Iowa Fluoride Study Targeted Nutrient Semi-quantitative Questionnaire and the Block Kids' Food Questionnaire for Estimating Beverage, Calcium, and Vitamin D Intakes By Children." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 108, no. 3, 2008, pp. 465-72.
Marshall TA, Eichenberger Gilmore JM, Broffitt B, et al. Relative validity of the Iowa Fluoride Study targeted nutrient semi-quantitative questionnaire and the block kids' food questionnaire for estimating beverage, calcium, and vitamin D intakes by children. J Am Diet Assoc. 2008;108(3):465-72.
Marshall, T. A., Eichenberger Gilmore, J. M., Broffitt, B., Stumbo, P. J., & Levy, S. M. (2008). Relative validity of the Iowa Fluoride Study targeted nutrient semi-quantitative questionnaire and the block kids' food questionnaire for estimating beverage, calcium, and vitamin D intakes by children. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 108(3), pp. 465-72. doi:10.1016/j.jada.2007.12.002.
Marshall TA, et al. Relative Validity of the Iowa Fluoride Study Targeted Nutrient Semi-quantitative Questionnaire and the Block Kids' Food Questionnaire for Estimating Beverage, Calcium, and Vitamin D Intakes By Children. J Am Diet Assoc. 2008;108(3):465-72. PubMed PMID: 18313429.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relative validity of the Iowa Fluoride Study targeted nutrient semi-quantitative questionnaire and the block kids' food questionnaire for estimating beverage, calcium, and vitamin D intakes by children. AU - Marshall,Teresa A, AU - Eichenberger Gilmore,Julie M, AU - Broffitt,Barbara, AU - Stumbo,Phyllis J, AU - Levy,Steven M, PY - 2006/08/03/received PY - 2008/3/4/pubmed PY - 2008/4/30/medline PY - 2008/3/4/entrez SP - 465 EP - 72 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 108 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Food frequency questionnaires are commonly developed and subsequently used to investigate relationships between dietary intake and disease outcomes; such tools should be validated in the population of interest. We investigated the relative validities of the Iowa Fluoride Study targeted nutrient semi-quantitative questionnaire and Block Kids' Food Questionnaire in assessing beverage, calcium, and vitamin D intakes using 3-day diaries for reference. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SUBJECTS: Children who completed Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaire at age 9.0+/-0.7 years (n=223) and/or the Block Kids' Food Questionnaire at age 8.3+/-0.3 years (n=129) and 3-day diaries during similar time periods. MAIN OUTCOMES: Intakes of beverages, calcium, and vitamin D. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Spearman correlation coefficients, weighted kappa statistics, and percentages of exact agreement were used to estimate relative validities. RESULTS: Correlations between milk intakes (r=0.572) reported on diaries and the Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaires were higher than correlations for 100% juice, juice drinks, soda pop, and water (r=0.252 to 0.379). Correlations between milk intakes (r=0.571) and 100% juice intakes (r=0.550) reported on diaries and Block Kids' Food Questionnaires were higher than correlations for other beverages (r=0.223 to 0.326). Correlations with diaries for calcium (r=0.462) and vitamin D (r=0.487) intakes reported on Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaires were similar to correlations with diaries for calcium (r=0.515) and vitamin D (r=0.512) reported on Block Kids' Food Questionnaires. Weighted kappa statistics were similar between the Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaires and the Block Kids' Food Questionnaires for milk, 100% juice, and vitamin D, but were higher on the Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaires than on the Block Kids' Food Questionnaires for calcium. Percentages of exact agreement were higher for calcium, but lower for vitamin D for intakes reported on the Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaires compared to the Block Kids' Food Questionnaires relative to diaries. CONCLUSIONS: Both the Iowa Fluoride Study nutrient questionnaire and the Block Kids' Food Questionnaire provide reasonable estimates of milk, calcium, and vitamin D intakes when compared to 3-day diaries. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18313429/Relative_validity_of_the_Iowa_Fluoride_Study_targeted_nutrient_semi_quantitative_questionnaire_and_the_block_kids'_food_questionnaire_for_estimating_beverage_calcium_and_vitamin_D_intakes_by_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(07)02203-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -