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Fear and disgust propensity in spider phobic distress.
J Anxiety Disord. 2008 Dec; 22(8):1285-96.JA

Abstract

Three studies examined associations between spider phobic distress and two individual difference characteristics, disgust propensity (sensitivity to disgust elicitation) and fear propensity (sensitivity to fear elicitation). Although the relative contributions of trait anxiety and disgust propensity have been examined, researchers have yet to compare the parallel constructs of disgust and fear propensity. Two studies examined associations cross-sectionally, and a third longitudinal study examined associations of fear and disgust propensity with changes in distress and avoidance over time. In the first cross-sectional study, animal and non-animal fear propensity were independently associated with spider distress and disgust propensity was not. In the other two studies, animal fear propensity and animal disgust propensity were independently related to spider distress and non-animal scores were not. Fear propensity, but not disgust propensity, was predictive of decreased avoidance over time. The results suggest that disgust and fear propensity independently contribute to spider distress vulnerability.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Wilkes Honors College, Florida Atlantic University, 5353 Parkside Drive, Jupiter, FL 33458, USA. lvernon@fau.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18313894

Citation

Vernon, Laura L., and Howard Berenbaum. "Fear and Disgust Propensity in Spider Phobic Distress." Journal of Anxiety Disorders, vol. 22, no. 8, 2008, pp. 1285-96.
Vernon LL, Berenbaum H. Fear and disgust propensity in spider phobic distress. J Anxiety Disord. 2008;22(8):1285-96.
Vernon, L. L., & Berenbaum, H. (2008). Fear and disgust propensity in spider phobic distress. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 22(8), 1285-96. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2008.01.009
Vernon LL, Berenbaum H. Fear and Disgust Propensity in Spider Phobic Distress. J Anxiety Disord. 2008;22(8):1285-96. PubMed PMID: 18313894.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fear and disgust propensity in spider phobic distress. AU - Vernon,Laura L, AU - Berenbaum,Howard, Y1 - 2008/01/19/ PY - 2007/06/16/received PY - 2008/01/10/revised PY - 2008/01/16/accepted PY - 2008/3/4/pubmed PY - 2009/1/13/medline PY - 2008/3/4/entrez SP - 1285 EP - 96 JF - Journal of anxiety disorders JO - J Anxiety Disord VL - 22 IS - 8 N2 - Three studies examined associations between spider phobic distress and two individual difference characteristics, disgust propensity (sensitivity to disgust elicitation) and fear propensity (sensitivity to fear elicitation). Although the relative contributions of trait anxiety and disgust propensity have been examined, researchers have yet to compare the parallel constructs of disgust and fear propensity. Two studies examined associations cross-sectionally, and a third longitudinal study examined associations of fear and disgust propensity with changes in distress and avoidance over time. In the first cross-sectional study, animal and non-animal fear propensity were independently associated with spider distress and disgust propensity was not. In the other two studies, animal fear propensity and animal disgust propensity were independently related to spider distress and non-animal scores were not. Fear propensity, but not disgust propensity, was predictive of decreased avoidance over time. The results suggest that disgust and fear propensity independently contribute to spider distress vulnerability. SN - 0887-6185 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18313894/Fear_and_disgust_propensity_in_spider_phobic_distress_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -