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Tympanometric findings in young children during upper respiratory tract infections with and without acute otitis media.
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2008 Apr; 27(4):292-5.PI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Upper respiratory tract infections (URI) likely lead to acute otitis media (AOM) by causing Eustachian tube dysfunction which creates negative middle ear pressure. Children younger than 2 years of age are at highest risk for AOM compared with older children and adults. There has been no published study comparing the middle ear status during URI in infants and young children by age group.

METHODS

We analyzed data from a prospective, longitudinal study of virus-induced AOM. Healthy children 6-35 months of age were enrolled in a study designed to capture all AOM after URI during a 1-year follow-up period. Tympanometry was used to address the middle ear status; tympanometric findings during the first week of URI were compared among different age groups. Tympanograms were classified into type A (normal), type B (middle ear effusion), and type C (negative middle ear pressure).

RESULTS

Children 6-11 months of age with URI experienced abnormal tympanograms more frequently than older children (P < 0.001). The peak day for an abnormal tympanogram was day 2 of the URI. Abnormal tympanogram tended to be type B in children age 6-23 months and type C in children age 24-47 months (P < 0.001). One-third of children older than 24 months of age had type C tympanogram during the first week of URI.

CONCLUSIONS

Eustachian tube dysfunction and middle ear abnormality during URI are more severe in children younger than 2 years of age, compared with older children. These findings could help explain the higher incidence of AOM after URI in younger children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18316989

Citation

Revai, Krystal, et al. "Tympanometric Findings in Young Children During Upper Respiratory Tract Infections With and Without Acute Otitis Media." The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 27, no. 4, 2008, pp. 292-5.
Revai K, Patel JA, Grady JJ, et al. Tympanometric findings in young children during upper respiratory tract infections with and without acute otitis media. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2008;27(4):292-5.
Revai, K., Patel, J. A., Grady, J. J., & Chonmaitree, T. (2008). Tympanometric findings in young children during upper respiratory tract infections with and without acute otitis media. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 27(4), 292-5. https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0b013e3181609a1f
Revai K, et al. Tympanometric Findings in Young Children During Upper Respiratory Tract Infections With and Without Acute Otitis Media. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2008;27(4):292-5. PubMed PMID: 18316989.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tympanometric findings in young children during upper respiratory tract infections with and without acute otitis media. AU - Revai,Krystal, AU - Patel,Janak A, AU - Grady,James J, AU - Chonmaitree,Tasnee, PY - 2008/3/5/pubmed PY - 2008/5/23/medline PY - 2008/3/5/entrez SP - 292 EP - 5 JF - The Pediatric infectious disease journal JO - Pediatr Infect Dis J VL - 27 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Upper respiratory tract infections (URI) likely lead to acute otitis media (AOM) by causing Eustachian tube dysfunction which creates negative middle ear pressure. Children younger than 2 years of age are at highest risk for AOM compared with older children and adults. There has been no published study comparing the middle ear status during URI in infants and young children by age group. METHODS: We analyzed data from a prospective, longitudinal study of virus-induced AOM. Healthy children 6-35 months of age were enrolled in a study designed to capture all AOM after URI during a 1-year follow-up period. Tympanometry was used to address the middle ear status; tympanometric findings during the first week of URI were compared among different age groups. Tympanograms were classified into type A (normal), type B (middle ear effusion), and type C (negative middle ear pressure). RESULTS: Children 6-11 months of age with URI experienced abnormal tympanograms more frequently than older children (P < 0.001). The peak day for an abnormal tympanogram was day 2 of the URI. Abnormal tympanogram tended to be type B in children age 6-23 months and type C in children age 24-47 months (P < 0.001). One-third of children older than 24 months of age had type C tympanogram during the first week of URI. CONCLUSIONS: Eustachian tube dysfunction and middle ear abnormality during URI are more severe in children younger than 2 years of age, compared with older children. These findings could help explain the higher incidence of AOM after URI in younger children. SN - 0891-3668 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18316989/Tympanometric_findings_in_young_children_during_upper_respiratory_tract_infections_with_and_without_acute_otitis_media_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0b013e3181609a1f DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -