Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Acrylamide in home-prepared roasted potatoes.
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2008 Mar; 52(3):307-12.MN

Abstract

Potato is one of the world's most widely grown tuber crop, in which starch is the predominant form of carbohydrates. Potatoes can be prepared in many ways: boiled, fried or roasted. Frying and roasting potatoes at high temperatures result in an appetizing crust, but at the same time acrylamide can form. In this study, the concentrations of the acrylamide precursors, asparagine and sugars, were determined in five different Swedish-grown potato varieties, together with the acrylamide content after typical home-cooking procedures; oven-roasting of potato wedges and pan-frying of cubes of boiled potatoes. Pan-frying of boiled potato cubes resulted in higher levels of acrylamide (530-1100 microg/kg) than in the wedges (140-250 microg/kg). Blanching combined with a shorter roasting time was shown to be an efficient way of reducing the acrylamide content in roasted potato wedges, especially in the experiments performed after long-term storage, where the acrylamide content was reduced from 110-260 to 50-140 microg/kg. No correlation was found between precursor content and acrylamide content, and this finding emphasizes the need for further studies on factors affecting acrylamide formation, for example, the availability of precursors at the surface during cooking.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Technology, Engineering and Nutrition, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Kerstin.Skog@appliednutrition.lth.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18320571

Citation

Skog, Kerstin, et al. "Acrylamide in Home-prepared Roasted Potatoes." Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, vol. 52, no. 3, 2008, pp. 307-12.
Skog K, Viklund G, Olsson K, et al. Acrylamide in home-prepared roasted potatoes. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2008;52(3):307-12.
Skog, K., Viklund, G., Olsson, K., & Sjöholm, I. (2008). Acrylamide in home-prepared roasted potatoes. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 52(3), 307-12. https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.200700240
Skog K, et al. Acrylamide in Home-prepared Roasted Potatoes. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2008;52(3):307-12. PubMed PMID: 18320571.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acrylamide in home-prepared roasted potatoes. AU - Skog,Kerstin, AU - Viklund,Gunilla, AU - Olsson,Kerstin, AU - Sjöholm,Ingegerd, PY - 2008/3/6/pubmed PY - 2008/4/11/medline PY - 2008/3/6/entrez SP - 307 EP - 12 JF - Molecular nutrition & food research JO - Mol Nutr Food Res VL - 52 IS - 3 N2 - Potato is one of the world's most widely grown tuber crop, in which starch is the predominant form of carbohydrates. Potatoes can be prepared in many ways: boiled, fried or roasted. Frying and roasting potatoes at high temperatures result in an appetizing crust, but at the same time acrylamide can form. In this study, the concentrations of the acrylamide precursors, asparagine and sugars, were determined in five different Swedish-grown potato varieties, together with the acrylamide content after typical home-cooking procedures; oven-roasting of potato wedges and pan-frying of cubes of boiled potatoes. Pan-frying of boiled potato cubes resulted in higher levels of acrylamide (530-1100 microg/kg) than in the wedges (140-250 microg/kg). Blanching combined with a shorter roasting time was shown to be an efficient way of reducing the acrylamide content in roasted potato wedges, especially in the experiments performed after long-term storage, where the acrylamide content was reduced from 110-260 to 50-140 microg/kg. No correlation was found between precursor content and acrylamide content, and this finding emphasizes the need for further studies on factors affecting acrylamide formation, for example, the availability of precursors at the surface during cooking. SN - 1613-4133 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18320571/Acrylamide_in_home_prepared_roasted_potatoes_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.200700240 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -