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Referral patterns between the child health service, general practitioners, and secondary healthcare: a prospective descriptive study in the Netherlands.
Eur J Gen Pract. 2007; 13(4):225-30.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In the Netherlands, preventive child health service (CHS) screening plays an important role in the early detection of congenital, developmental, physical, and mental disorders.

OBJECTIVE

To obtain insight into the referral patterns of children from CHS to general practitioners and from general practitioners to medical specialists.

METHODS

Prospective study over 6 months in a semi-urban area in the Netherlands. All correspondence from the participating doctors was sticker marked and, after each contact, a registration card was sent to a central secretariat. The referral stream between general practitioners and specialists or allied health professionals was extracted from a central database. The general practitioners and the participating paediatricians were asked to complete a questionnaire about the quality and necessity of the referral.

RESULTS

Out of an estimated 2600 examinations, 45 children were referred to their general practitioners for further examination. The problems of eight children were settled by the GP, 10 children were referred to allied health professionals, and 24 children were referred to specialists. The median time span of showing up at the GP's office was 6.5 days. Sixteen per cent showed up long after having been referred by the CHS. The parents of three children did not comply. Of the 397 referrals from GPs to medical specialists and allied health professionals, 8.5% were initiated by the CHS.

CONCLUSION

The amount of referrals from the CHS to GPs and of referrals from GPs to medical specialists and allied health professionals initiated by the CHS is low in terms of absolute percentages. Most referrals by the CHS were considered useful.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18324504

Citation

Einhorn, Rubin, et al. "Referral Patterns Between the Child Health Service, General Practitioners, and Secondary Healthcare: a Prospective Descriptive Study in the Netherlands." The European Journal of General Practice, vol. 13, no. 4, 2007, pp. 225-30.
Einhorn R, Eekhof JA, Engelberts AC, et al. Referral patterns between the child health service, general practitioners, and secondary healthcare: a prospective descriptive study in the Netherlands. Eur J Gen Pract. 2007;13(4):225-30.
Einhorn, R., Eekhof, J. A., Engelberts, A. C., Groeneveld, Y., Verkerk, P. H., & Wit, J. M. (2007). Referral patterns between the child health service, general practitioners, and secondary healthcare: a prospective descriptive study in the Netherlands. The European Journal of General Practice, 13(4), 225-30. https://doi.org/10.1080/13814780701814853
Einhorn R, et al. Referral Patterns Between the Child Health Service, General Practitioners, and Secondary Healthcare: a Prospective Descriptive Study in the Netherlands. Eur J Gen Pract. 2007;13(4):225-30. PubMed PMID: 18324504.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Referral patterns between the child health service, general practitioners, and secondary healthcare: a prospective descriptive study in the Netherlands. AU - Einhorn,Rubin, AU - Eekhof,Just A H, AU - Engelberts,Adele C, AU - Groeneveld,Ymte, AU - Verkerk,Paul H, AU - Wit,Jan M, PY - 2008/3/8/pubmed PY - 2008/6/20/medline PY - 2008/3/8/entrez SP - 225 EP - 30 JF - The European journal of general practice JO - Eur J Gen Pract VL - 13 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: In the Netherlands, preventive child health service (CHS) screening plays an important role in the early detection of congenital, developmental, physical, and mental disorders. OBJECTIVE: To obtain insight into the referral patterns of children from CHS to general practitioners and from general practitioners to medical specialists. METHODS: Prospective study over 6 months in a semi-urban area in the Netherlands. All correspondence from the participating doctors was sticker marked and, after each contact, a registration card was sent to a central secretariat. The referral stream between general practitioners and specialists or allied health professionals was extracted from a central database. The general practitioners and the participating paediatricians were asked to complete a questionnaire about the quality and necessity of the referral. RESULTS: Out of an estimated 2600 examinations, 45 children were referred to their general practitioners for further examination. The problems of eight children were settled by the GP, 10 children were referred to allied health professionals, and 24 children were referred to specialists. The median time span of showing up at the GP's office was 6.5 days. Sixteen per cent showed up long after having been referred by the CHS. The parents of three children did not comply. Of the 397 referrals from GPs to medical specialists and allied health professionals, 8.5% were initiated by the CHS. CONCLUSION: The amount of referrals from the CHS to GPs and of referrals from GPs to medical specialists and allied health professionals initiated by the CHS is low in terms of absolute percentages. Most referrals by the CHS were considered useful. SN - 1381-4788 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18324504/Referral_patterns_between_the_child_health_service_general_practitioners_and_secondary_healthcare:_a_prospective_descriptive_study_in_the_Netherlands_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13814780701814853 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -