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NeuroQuick--a novel bedside test for small fiber neuropathy?
Eur J Pain. 2008 Nov; 12(8):1000-7.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

An appropriate bedside test for small fiber neuropathy does not exist so far. Cold hypaesthesia occurs as an early onset symptom, and the new handheld device NeuroQuick (NQ) was recently claimed to be a valid and reliable screening tool for its quantitative assessment.

AIMS

Comparison of the NQ with standardized quantitative sensory testing (QST) in patients suffering from chronic painful dysaesthesia with and without pathological cold detection threshold (CDT).

METHODS

Forty-one patients with and without diabetes mellitus displaying chronic painful dysaesthesia were included (18 men, 55.8+/-13 years). According to the German network protocol QST was performed in the body area with the severest symptoms and at the opposite side as control after thorough clinical-neurological examination. The NeuroQuick, developed as quantitative bedside testing of cold thermal perception based on the wind chill, was used subsequently.

RESULTS

DT was pathologically increased in 14 and within normal range in 27 patients; NQ values were pathological in 9 and non-pathological in 32 patients. Thus NQ obtained 7.4% false positive and 50% false negative results in detecting cold hypaesthesia, corresponding to 92.6% specificity, 50% sensitivity and a positive and negative predictive value of 78%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrates that the NeuroQuick is not an adequate screening device for cold hypaesthesia in patients with chronic neuropathic pain. It exhibits a high specificity but only low sensitivity in the identification of such small fiber dysfunction; a reliable and valid screening tool should necessarily provide opposite features.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neurologische Universitätsklinik, Berufsgenossenschaftliche Universitätsklinik Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany. ida@haussleiter.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18325802

Citation

Haussleiter, Ida S., et al. "NeuroQuick--a Novel Bedside Test for Small Fiber Neuropathy?" European Journal of Pain (London, England), vol. 12, no. 8, 2008, pp. 1000-7.
Haussleiter IS, Richter H, Scherens A, et al. NeuroQuick--a novel bedside test for small fiber neuropathy? Eur J Pain. 2008;12(8):1000-7.
Haussleiter, I. S., Richter, H., Scherens, A., Schwenkreis, P., Tegenthoff, M., & Maier, C. (2008). NeuroQuick--a novel bedside test for small fiber neuropathy? European Journal of Pain (London, England), 12(8), 1000-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpain.2008.01.005
Haussleiter IS, et al. NeuroQuick--a Novel Bedside Test for Small Fiber Neuropathy. Eur J Pain. 2008;12(8):1000-7. PubMed PMID: 18325802.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - NeuroQuick--a novel bedside test for small fiber neuropathy? AU - Haussleiter,Ida S, AU - Richter,Helmut, AU - Scherens,Andrea, AU - Schwenkreis,Peter, AU - Tegenthoff,Martin, AU - Maier,Christoph, Y1 - 2008/03/05/ PY - 2007/07/03/received PY - 2008/01/10/revised PY - 2008/01/23/accepted PY - 2008/3/8/pubmed PY - 2008/10/31/medline PY - 2008/3/8/entrez SP - 1000 EP - 7 JF - European journal of pain (London, England) JO - Eur J Pain VL - 12 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: An appropriate bedside test for small fiber neuropathy does not exist so far. Cold hypaesthesia occurs as an early onset symptom, and the new handheld device NeuroQuick (NQ) was recently claimed to be a valid and reliable screening tool for its quantitative assessment. AIMS: Comparison of the NQ with standardized quantitative sensory testing (QST) in patients suffering from chronic painful dysaesthesia with and without pathological cold detection threshold (CDT). METHODS: Forty-one patients with and without diabetes mellitus displaying chronic painful dysaesthesia were included (18 men, 55.8+/-13 years). According to the German network protocol QST was performed in the body area with the severest symptoms and at the opposite side as control after thorough clinical-neurological examination. The NeuroQuick, developed as quantitative bedside testing of cold thermal perception based on the wind chill, was used subsequently. RESULTS: DT was pathologically increased in 14 and within normal range in 27 patients; NQ values were pathological in 9 and non-pathological in 32 patients. Thus NQ obtained 7.4% false positive and 50% false negative results in detecting cold hypaesthesia, corresponding to 92.6% specificity, 50% sensitivity and a positive and negative predictive value of 78%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that the NeuroQuick is not an adequate screening device for cold hypaesthesia in patients with chronic neuropathic pain. It exhibits a high specificity but only low sensitivity in the identification of such small fiber dysfunction; a reliable and valid screening tool should necessarily provide opposite features. SN - 1532-2149 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18325802/NeuroQuick__a_novel_bedside_test_for_small_fiber_neuropathy L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1090-3801(08)00013-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -