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Dietary fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: an epidemiological approach.
Prog Lipid Res 2008; 47(3):172-87PL

Abstract

The quality of dietary fat in relation to cardiovascular disease forms the basis of the diet-heart hypothesis. Current recommendations on dietary fat now emphasise quality rather than quantity. The focus of this review is to summarise the results from prospective cohort studies on dietary fat and cardiovascular disease outcomes. Relatively few prospective cohort studies have found an association between dietary fat quality and cardiovascular disease, partly because of limitations in estimating dietary intake. Saturated and trans fatty acids have increased cardiovascular risk in several studies. Both n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been associated with lower cardiovascular risk. Within the n-6 series, linoleic acid seems to decrease cardiovascular risk. Within the n-3 series the long-chain fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids) are associated with decreased risk for especially fatal coronary outcomes, whereas the role of alpha-linolenic acid is less clear. Dietary fat quality also influences the activity of enzymes involved in the desaturation of fatty acids in the body. Serum desaturase indices have been consistently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Data from metabolic and clinical studies reinforce findings from observational studies supporting recommendations to replace saturated and trans fat with unsaturated fat in the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, School of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18328267

Citation

Erkkilä, Arja, et al. "Dietary Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: an Epidemiological Approach." Progress in Lipid Research, vol. 47, no. 3, 2008, pp. 172-87.
Erkkilä A, de Mello VD, Risérus U, et al. Dietary fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: an epidemiological approach. Prog Lipid Res. 2008;47(3):172-87.
Erkkilä, A., de Mello, V. D., Risérus, U., & Laaksonen, D. E. (2008). Dietary fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: an epidemiological approach. Progress in Lipid Research, 47(3), pp. 172-87. doi:10.1016/j.plipres.2008.01.004.
Erkkilä A, et al. Dietary Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: an Epidemiological Approach. Prog Lipid Res. 2008;47(3):172-87. PubMed PMID: 18328267.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: an epidemiological approach. AU - Erkkilä,Arja, AU - de Mello,Vanessa D F, AU - Risérus,Ulf, AU - Laaksonen,David E, Y1 - 2008/02/15/ PY - 2008/01/02/received PY - 2008/01/11/revised PY - 2008/01/15/accepted PY - 2008/3/11/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/3/11/entrez SP - 172 EP - 87 JF - Progress in lipid research JO - Prog. Lipid Res. VL - 47 IS - 3 N2 - The quality of dietary fat in relation to cardiovascular disease forms the basis of the diet-heart hypothesis. Current recommendations on dietary fat now emphasise quality rather than quantity. The focus of this review is to summarise the results from prospective cohort studies on dietary fat and cardiovascular disease outcomes. Relatively few prospective cohort studies have found an association between dietary fat quality and cardiovascular disease, partly because of limitations in estimating dietary intake. Saturated and trans fatty acids have increased cardiovascular risk in several studies. Both n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been associated with lower cardiovascular risk. Within the n-6 series, linoleic acid seems to decrease cardiovascular risk. Within the n-3 series the long-chain fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids) are associated with decreased risk for especially fatal coronary outcomes, whereas the role of alpha-linolenic acid is less clear. Dietary fat quality also influences the activity of enzymes involved in the desaturation of fatty acids in the body. Serum desaturase indices have been consistently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Data from metabolic and clinical studies reinforce findings from observational studies supporting recommendations to replace saturated and trans fat with unsaturated fat in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. SN - 0163-7827 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18328267/Dietary_fatty_acids_and_cardiovascular_disease:_an_epidemiological_approach_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0163-7827(08)00003-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -