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Prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome among undergraduates in Southeast China.
Dig Liver Dis 2008; 40(6):418-24DL

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is a wide range in reported prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome worldwide. From the data appeared recently in medical literatures in China, it seems that the incidence of irritable bowel syndrome in young adults is not dissimilar to the one in the Western countries.

AIMS

To explore the prevalence and epidemiological variations of irritable bowel syndrome in an undergraduate student population in Southeast China on the basis of the Rome II and Rome III criteria.

METHODS

All the undergraduate student participants were administered self-report diagnostic measures for irritable bowel syndrome.

RESULTS

The sex-adjusted prevalence rate of irritable bowel syndrome was 4.7% (Rome II) and 10.4% (Rome III), respectively. When we combined irritable bowel syndrome mixed and irritable bowel syndrome unsubtyped in the Rome III subgroups into one group considering the counterpart in the Rome II subgroups was alternative irritable bowel syndrome, the agreement between the two ways to subdivide these 54 patients who were identified with irritable bowel syndrome by both the two criteria was 81%, with a kappa value of 0.67. By the Rome III criteria, we found a female predominance which was especially attributed to the subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and unsubtyped.

CONCLUSIONS

Our study suggests that, in young adults in Southeast China, changing diagnostic criteria for irritable bowel syndrome from Rome II to Rome III may affect women more than men on not only the overall prevalence rate but also the sex-difference present or not, especially in irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and irritable bowel syndrome unsubtyped subgroups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016, PR China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18339591

Citation

Dai, N, et al. "Prevalence of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Among Undergraduates in Southeast China." Digestive and Liver Disease : Official Journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, vol. 40, no. 6, 2008, pp. 418-24.
Dai N, Cong Y, Yuan H. Prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome among undergraduates in Southeast China. Dig Liver Dis. 2008;40(6):418-24.
Dai, N., Cong, Y., & Yuan, H. (2008). Prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome among undergraduates in Southeast China. Digestive and Liver Disease : Official Journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, 40(6), pp. 418-24. doi:10.1016/j.dld.2008.01.019.
Dai N, Cong Y, Yuan H. Prevalence of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Among Undergraduates in Southeast China. Dig Liver Dis. 2008;40(6):418-24. PubMed PMID: 18339591.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome among undergraduates in Southeast China. AU - Dai,N, AU - Cong,Y, AU - Yuan,H, Y1 - 2008/03/12/ PY - 2007/10/21/received PY - 2008/01/10/revised PY - 2008/01/29/accepted PY - 2008/3/15/pubmed PY - 2008/7/3/medline PY - 2008/3/15/entrez SP - 418 EP - 24 JF - Digestive and liver disease : official journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver JO - Dig Liver Dis VL - 40 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is a wide range in reported prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome worldwide. From the data appeared recently in medical literatures in China, it seems that the incidence of irritable bowel syndrome in young adults is not dissimilar to the one in the Western countries. AIMS: To explore the prevalence and epidemiological variations of irritable bowel syndrome in an undergraduate student population in Southeast China on the basis of the Rome II and Rome III criteria. METHODS: All the undergraduate student participants were administered self-report diagnostic measures for irritable bowel syndrome. RESULTS: The sex-adjusted prevalence rate of irritable bowel syndrome was 4.7% (Rome II) and 10.4% (Rome III), respectively. When we combined irritable bowel syndrome mixed and irritable bowel syndrome unsubtyped in the Rome III subgroups into one group considering the counterpart in the Rome II subgroups was alternative irritable bowel syndrome, the agreement between the two ways to subdivide these 54 patients who were identified with irritable bowel syndrome by both the two criteria was 81%, with a kappa value of 0.67. By the Rome III criteria, we found a female predominance which was especially attributed to the subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and unsubtyped. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that, in young adults in Southeast China, changing diagnostic criteria for irritable bowel syndrome from Rome II to Rome III may affect women more than men on not only the overall prevalence rate but also the sex-difference present or not, especially in irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and irritable bowel syndrome unsubtyped subgroups. SN - 1878-3562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18339591/Prevalence_of_irritable_bowel_syndrome_among_undergraduates_in_Southeast_China_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1590-8658(08)00039-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -