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The MELD-Na is an independent short- and long-term prognostic predictor for hepatocellular carcinoma: a prospective survey.
Dig Liver Dis. 2008 Nov; 40(11):882-9.DL

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Serum sodium has been suggested to incorporate into the model for end-stage liver disease to enhance its prognostic ability for cirrhosis. A mathematical equation based on model for end-stage liver disease and sodium, known as "MELD-Na", was developed for outcome prediction for cirrhosis. The severity of liver cirrhosis is a key component to predict survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. This study investigated the prognostic role of MELD-Na for hepatocellular carcinoma.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

A total of 535 unselected hepatocellular carcinoma patients were prospectively enrolled to evaluate the performance of MELD-Na.

RESULTS

The MELD-Na was better than model for end-stage liver disease in predicting 6-month mortality by comparing the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (0.782 vs. 0.761, p=0.101). MELD-Na, but not model for end-stage liver disease, was an independent predictor associated with 6-month mortality in multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio: 1.14, p=0.001). In the survival analysis, MELD-Na also independently predicted mortality, with an additional risk of 4.3% per unit increment of the score (p<0.001). Patients with MELD-Na scores between 10 and 20 and scores >20 had 2.1-fold (p<0.001) and 7.5-fold (p<0.001) risk of mortality, respectively, compared to patients with a score <10 in the Cox proportional hazard model.

CONCLUSION

The MELD-Na score is a feasible and independent prognostic predictor for both short- and long-term outcome predictions in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. tihuo@vghtpe.gov.twNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18339595

Citation

Huo, T-I, et al. "The MELD-Na Is an Independent Short- and Long-term Prognostic Predictor for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: a Prospective Survey." Digestive and Liver Disease : Official Journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, vol. 40, no. 11, 2008, pp. 882-9.
Huo TI, Lin HC, Hsia CY, et al. The MELD-Na is an independent short- and long-term prognostic predictor for hepatocellular carcinoma: a prospective survey. Dig Liver Dis. 2008;40(11):882-9.
Huo, T. I., Lin, H. C., Hsia, C. Y., Huang, Y. H., Wu, J. C., Chiang, J. H., Chiou, Y. Y., Lui, W. Y., Lee, P. C., & Lee, S. D. (2008). The MELD-Na is an independent short- and long-term prognostic predictor for hepatocellular carcinoma: a prospective survey. Digestive and Liver Disease : Official Journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, 40(11), 882-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dld.2008.01.015
Huo TI, et al. The MELD-Na Is an Independent Short- and Long-term Prognostic Predictor for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: a Prospective Survey. Dig Liver Dis. 2008;40(11):882-9. PubMed PMID: 18339595.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The MELD-Na is an independent short- and long-term prognostic predictor for hepatocellular carcinoma: a prospective survey. AU - Huo,T-I, AU - Lin,H-C, AU - Hsia,C-Y, AU - Huang,Y-H, AU - Wu,J-C, AU - Chiang,J-H, AU - Chiou,Y-Y, AU - Lui,W-Y, AU - Lee,P-C, AU - Lee,S-D, Y1 - 2008/03/12/ PY - 2007/11/05/received PY - 2007/12/17/revised PY - 2008/01/29/accepted PY - 2008/3/15/pubmed PY - 2009/1/16/medline PY - 2008/3/15/entrez SP - 882 EP - 9 JF - Digestive and liver disease : official journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver JO - Dig Liver Dis VL - 40 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Serum sodium has been suggested to incorporate into the model for end-stage liver disease to enhance its prognostic ability for cirrhosis. A mathematical equation based on model for end-stage liver disease and sodium, known as "MELD-Na", was developed for outcome prediction for cirrhosis. The severity of liver cirrhosis is a key component to predict survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. This study investigated the prognostic role of MELD-Na for hepatocellular carcinoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 535 unselected hepatocellular carcinoma patients were prospectively enrolled to evaluate the performance of MELD-Na. RESULTS: The MELD-Na was better than model for end-stage liver disease in predicting 6-month mortality by comparing the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (0.782 vs. 0.761, p=0.101). MELD-Na, but not model for end-stage liver disease, was an independent predictor associated with 6-month mortality in multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio: 1.14, p=0.001). In the survival analysis, MELD-Na also independently predicted mortality, with an additional risk of 4.3% per unit increment of the score (p<0.001). Patients with MELD-Na scores between 10 and 20 and scores >20 had 2.1-fold (p<0.001) and 7.5-fold (p<0.001) risk of mortality, respectively, compared to patients with a score <10 in the Cox proportional hazard model. CONCLUSION: The MELD-Na score is a feasible and independent prognostic predictor for both short- and long-term outcome predictions in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. SN - 1878-3562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18339595/The_MELD_Na_is_an_independent_short__and_long_term_prognostic_predictor_for_hepatocellular_carcinoma:_a_prospective_survey_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1590-8658(08)00035-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -