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Surgeons' perceptions and injuries during and after urologic laparoscopic surgery.
Urology. 2008 Mar; 71(3):404-7.U

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The biomechanical and mental strains placed on the surgeon while performing laparoscopic procedures are significantly higher compared with open surgical techniques. We undertook this study to assess the prevalence of surgeons' deleterious perceptions or injuries related to laparoscopic urologic surgery.

METHODS

Members of endourological society were mailed a questionnaire evaluating their laparoscopic experience, total number of standard laparoscopic surgeries (SLS), hand-assisted laparoscopic surgeries (HALS), and robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgeries (RALS) they performed. The subjects reported any neuromuscular or arthritic injuries sustained during laparoscopic surgery, and graded the degree of pain, numbness, and fatigue they experienced.

RESULTS

A total of 73 urologists completed the questionnaires. The average responder was 44 years old, had completed a median of 117 procedures, and was performing 3 laparoscopic surgeries per week. Neuromuscular or arthritic symptoms during surgery were reported by 22 responders (30%), the most common was finger paresthesia (18%). At the conclusion of HALS, 45% of the surgeons suffered from hand and wrist numbness and 37% reported pain in these areas. A significant association was observed between the risk of sustaining injury during surgery and the total number of laparoscopic procedures performed by the responder (P = 0.016). RALS was the procedure least associated with injuries, and HALS the most.

CONCLUSIONS

The laparoscopic operating theater is a hostile ergonomic environment. Surgeons' awareness of the common injuries associated with laparoscopic surgery and careful equipment adjustments before surgery are mandatory to minimize injury. Future improvements in instrument design according to ergonomic principles are highly warranted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Section of Urology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ong1000@netvision.net.ilNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18342173

Citation

Gofrit, Ofer N., et al. "Surgeons' Perceptions and Injuries During and After Urologic Laparoscopic Surgery." Urology, vol. 71, no. 3, 2008, pp. 404-7.
Gofrit ON, Mikahail AA, Zorn KC, et al. Surgeons' perceptions and injuries during and after urologic laparoscopic surgery. Urology. 2008;71(3):404-7.
Gofrit, O. N., Mikahail, A. A., Zorn, K. C., Zagaja, G. P., Steinberg, G. D., & Shalhav, A. L. (2008). Surgeons' perceptions and injuries during and after urologic laparoscopic surgery. Urology, 71(3), 404-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2007.07.077
Gofrit ON, et al. Surgeons' Perceptions and Injuries During and After Urologic Laparoscopic Surgery. Urology. 2008;71(3):404-7. PubMed PMID: 18342173.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Surgeons' perceptions and injuries during and after urologic laparoscopic surgery. AU - Gofrit,Ofer N, AU - Mikahail,Albert A, AU - Zorn,Kevin C, AU - Zagaja,Gregory P, AU - Steinberg,Gary D, AU - Shalhav,Arieh L, PY - 2006/10/29/received PY - 2007/04/15/revised PY - 2007/07/12/accepted PY - 2008/3/18/pubmed PY - 2008/5/29/medline PY - 2008/3/18/entrez SP - 404 EP - 7 JF - Urology JO - Urology VL - 71 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The biomechanical and mental strains placed on the surgeon while performing laparoscopic procedures are significantly higher compared with open surgical techniques. We undertook this study to assess the prevalence of surgeons' deleterious perceptions or injuries related to laparoscopic urologic surgery. METHODS: Members of endourological society were mailed a questionnaire evaluating their laparoscopic experience, total number of standard laparoscopic surgeries (SLS), hand-assisted laparoscopic surgeries (HALS), and robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgeries (RALS) they performed. The subjects reported any neuromuscular or arthritic injuries sustained during laparoscopic surgery, and graded the degree of pain, numbness, and fatigue they experienced. RESULTS: A total of 73 urologists completed the questionnaires. The average responder was 44 years old, had completed a median of 117 procedures, and was performing 3 laparoscopic surgeries per week. Neuromuscular or arthritic symptoms during surgery were reported by 22 responders (30%), the most common was finger paresthesia (18%). At the conclusion of HALS, 45% of the surgeons suffered from hand and wrist numbness and 37% reported pain in these areas. A significant association was observed between the risk of sustaining injury during surgery and the total number of laparoscopic procedures performed by the responder (P = 0.016). RALS was the procedure least associated with injuries, and HALS the most. CONCLUSIONS: The laparoscopic operating theater is a hostile ergonomic environment. Surgeons' awareness of the common injuries associated with laparoscopic surgery and careful equipment adjustments before surgery are mandatory to minimize injury. Future improvements in instrument design according to ergonomic principles are highly warranted. SN - 1527-9995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18342173/Surgeons'_perceptions_and_injuries_during_and_after_urologic_laparoscopic_surgery_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -