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Solar ultraviolet B radiation compared with prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates in United States.
Urology 2008; 71(3):531-5U

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate whether the prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates in the United States correlate inversely with solar ultraviolet (UV) B radiation levels computed from a mathematical model using forecasted ozone levels, cloud levels, and elevation. Another objective was to explore whether the annual prostate cancer rates correlated more strongly with the cumulative UVB exposure for the year or for exposure during certain seasons.

METHODS

The age-adjusted incidence and mortality cancer rates for black and white men in the continental United States were correlated with the mean UV index values averaged for the year and for each season.

RESULTS

We found an inverse correlation between the UVB levels and prostate cancer incidence (R = -0.42, P <0.01) and mortality rates (R = -0.53, P <0.001) for white men and for incidence (R = -0.40, P <0.05) for black men, but the strength of the correlation depended on the season of UVB irradiance. No statistically significant results for black male mortality were found. The annual prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates for white men correlated most strongly with UVB exposure levels in the fall and winter, and incidence rates for black men correlated with UVB exposure levels in the summer.

CONCLUSIONS

Increased solar UVB radiation might reduce the risk of prostate cancer, but the efficacy depends on the season of UVB irradiance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, University of Alabama, Birmingham, School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA. jan.colli@ccc.uab.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18342203

Citation

Colli, Janet L., and William B. Grant. "Solar Ultraviolet B Radiation Compared With Prostate Cancer Incidence and Mortality Rates in United States." Urology, vol. 71, no. 3, 2008, pp. 531-5.
Colli JL, Grant WB. Solar ultraviolet B radiation compared with prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates in United States. Urology. 2008;71(3):531-5.
Colli, J. L., & Grant, W. B. (2008). Solar ultraviolet B radiation compared with prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates in United States. Urology, 71(3), pp. 531-5. doi:10.1016/j.urology.2007.10.050.
Colli JL, Grant WB. Solar Ultraviolet B Radiation Compared With Prostate Cancer Incidence and Mortality Rates in United States. Urology. 2008;71(3):531-5. PubMed PMID: 18342203.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Solar ultraviolet B radiation compared with prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates in United States. AU - Colli,Janet L, AU - Grant,William B, PY - 2007/06/27/received PY - 2007/09/24/revised PY - 2007/10/25/accepted PY - 2008/3/18/pubmed PY - 2008/5/29/medline PY - 2008/3/18/entrez SP - 531 EP - 5 JF - Urology JO - Urology VL - 71 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates in the United States correlate inversely with solar ultraviolet (UV) B radiation levels computed from a mathematical model using forecasted ozone levels, cloud levels, and elevation. Another objective was to explore whether the annual prostate cancer rates correlated more strongly with the cumulative UVB exposure for the year or for exposure during certain seasons. METHODS: The age-adjusted incidence and mortality cancer rates for black and white men in the continental United States were correlated with the mean UV index values averaged for the year and for each season. RESULTS: We found an inverse correlation between the UVB levels and prostate cancer incidence (R = -0.42, P <0.01) and mortality rates (R = -0.53, P <0.001) for white men and for incidence (R = -0.40, P <0.05) for black men, but the strength of the correlation depended on the season of UVB irradiance. No statistically significant results for black male mortality were found. The annual prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates for white men correlated most strongly with UVB exposure levels in the fall and winter, and incidence rates for black men correlated with UVB exposure levels in the summer. CONCLUSIONS: Increased solar UVB radiation might reduce the risk of prostate cancer, but the efficacy depends on the season of UVB irradiance. SN - 1527-9995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18342203/Solar_ultraviolet_B_radiation_compared_with_prostate_cancer_incidence_and_mortality_rates_in_United_States_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0090-4295(07)02305-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -