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Breakfast skipping is associated with differences in meal patterns, macronutrient intakes and overweight among pre-school children.
Public Health Nutr. 2009 Jan; 12(1):19-28.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the association between skipping breakfast, daily energy, macronutrients and food intakes, and BMI in pre-school children.

DESIGN

A cross-sectional study using information on children's food consumption and measured height and weight. Energy and macronutrient intakes of the children were derived from parent/day-care attendant's responses to 24 h recall interviews and eating behaviour questionnaires.

SETTING

Data obtained from a representative sample (n 2,103) of children born in Quebec (Canada) in 1998.

SUBJECTS

One thousand five hundred and forty-nine children, with a mean age of 49 (sd 3.12) months.

RESULTS

Ten per cent of children ate breakfast on fewer than 7 days per week. This behaviour was associated with a lower diet quality and concentrated energy intakes through higher protein intakes at lunch and the consumption of snacks higher in energy and carbohydrate in the afternoon and evening; yet total daily energy intakes were not significantly different from those of pre-school children who ate breakfast every day. Breakfast skippers' mean BMI increased as intake of energy, carbohydrates or servings of grain products increased; however, this was not the case for breakfast eaters. When Cole's cut-off for overweight/obesity was used, overweight/obesity in breakfast skippers was related to the dinner-time consumption of approximately 3,000 kJ (700 kcal) or more for energy intake, approximately 100 g or more of carbohydrates, or approximately 3 servings or more of grain products.

CONCLUSIONS

Eating breakfast every day is associated with having a healthy body weight, likely due to a more even distribution of energy intake across meals throughout the day.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, 1 Stewart Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1N 6N5. lise.dubois@uottawa.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18346309

Citation

Dubois, Lise, et al. "Breakfast Skipping Is Associated With Differences in Meal Patterns, Macronutrient Intakes and Overweight Among Pre-school Children." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 12, no. 1, 2009, pp. 19-28.
Dubois L, Girard M, Potvin Kent M, et al. Breakfast skipping is associated with differences in meal patterns, macronutrient intakes and overweight among pre-school children. Public Health Nutr. 2009;12(1):19-28.
Dubois, L., Girard, M., Potvin Kent, M., Farmer, A., & Tatone-Tokuda, F. (2009). Breakfast skipping is associated with differences in meal patterns, macronutrient intakes and overweight among pre-school children. Public Health Nutrition, 12(1), 19-28. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980008001894
Dubois L, et al. Breakfast Skipping Is Associated With Differences in Meal Patterns, Macronutrient Intakes and Overweight Among Pre-school Children. Public Health Nutr. 2009;12(1):19-28. PubMed PMID: 18346309.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Breakfast skipping is associated with differences in meal patterns, macronutrient intakes and overweight among pre-school children. AU - Dubois,Lise, AU - Girard,Manon, AU - Potvin Kent,Monique, AU - Farmer,Anna, AU - Tatone-Tokuda,Fabiola, Y1 - 2008/03/18/ PY - 2008/3/19/entrez PY - 2008/3/19/pubmed PY - 2009/2/14/medline SP - 19 EP - 28 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 12 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between skipping breakfast, daily energy, macronutrients and food intakes, and BMI in pre-school children. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study using information on children's food consumption and measured height and weight. Energy and macronutrient intakes of the children were derived from parent/day-care attendant's responses to 24 h recall interviews and eating behaviour questionnaires. SETTING: Data obtained from a representative sample (n 2,103) of children born in Quebec (Canada) in 1998. SUBJECTS: One thousand five hundred and forty-nine children, with a mean age of 49 (sd 3.12) months. RESULTS: Ten per cent of children ate breakfast on fewer than 7 days per week. This behaviour was associated with a lower diet quality and concentrated energy intakes through higher protein intakes at lunch and the consumption of snacks higher in energy and carbohydrate in the afternoon and evening; yet total daily energy intakes were not significantly different from those of pre-school children who ate breakfast every day. Breakfast skippers' mean BMI increased as intake of energy, carbohydrates or servings of grain products increased; however, this was not the case for breakfast eaters. When Cole's cut-off for overweight/obesity was used, overweight/obesity in breakfast skippers was related to the dinner-time consumption of approximately 3,000 kJ (700 kcal) or more for energy intake, approximately 100 g or more of carbohydrates, or approximately 3 servings or more of grain products. CONCLUSIONS: Eating breakfast every day is associated with having a healthy body weight, likely due to a more even distribution of energy intake across meals throughout the day. SN - 1368-9800 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18346309/Breakfast_skipping_is_associated_with_differences_in_meal_patterns_macronutrient_intakes_and_overweight_among_pre_school_children_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980008001894/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -