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Causes of frequency and nocturia after renal transplantation.
BJU Int. 2008 Apr; 101(8):1029-34.BI

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To explore the role of bladder capacity, bladder pain, dysfunctional voiding, urgency, urinary tract infections (UTIs), and urinary output as potential causes of frequency and nocturia after renal transplantation.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Data were gathered from 52 adult renal transplant patients (35 men and 17 women, mean age 49 years), using a written questionnaire, medical records, frequency/volume charts, and urinary cultures. The mean time between transplantation and data collection was 5 months. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used for the simultaneous assessment of direct and indirect relationships between explanatory variables and voiding frequency.

RESULTS

Frequency and nocturia were found in 54% and 60% of the study population, respectively. Frequency was directly associated with a small bladder capacity, bladder pain, urgency, and a high daytime urine volume, and indirectly by UTIs (via urgency and bladder pain). Nocturia was associated with high nocturnal urine volume, small bladder capacity and dysfunctional voiding. A quarter of the patients had small bladders and another quarter had large bladders, the latter being associated with nocturnal polyuria.

CONCLUSIONS

The presence of frequency, especially when accompanied by bladder pain, might aid the physician to identify patients with small bladders. The presence of nocturia can be the result of a high nocturnal urine volume, which increases the risk of bladder enlargement. Because both abnormal bladder conditions can contribute to graft dysfunction, we recommend a urological follow-up after renal transplantation, using frequency/volume charts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. M.vanderweide@csscb.umcn.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18353158

Citation

Van der Weide, Marian J A., et al. "Causes of Frequency and Nocturia After Renal Transplantation." BJU International, vol. 101, no. 8, 2008, pp. 1029-34.
Van der Weide MJ, Van Achterberg T, Smits JP, et al. Causes of frequency and nocturia after renal transplantation. BJU Int. 2008;101(8):1029-34.
Van der Weide, M. J., Van Achterberg, T., Smits, J. P., Heesakkers, J. P., Bemelmans, B. L., & Hilbrands, L. B. (2008). Causes of frequency and nocturia after renal transplantation. BJU International, 101(8), 1029-34. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-410X.2007.07292.x
Van der Weide MJ, et al. Causes of Frequency and Nocturia After Renal Transplantation. BJU Int. 2008;101(8):1029-34. PubMed PMID: 18353158.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Causes of frequency and nocturia after renal transplantation. AU - Van der Weide,Marian J A, AU - Van Achterberg,Theo, AU - Smits,Jeroen P J M, AU - Heesakkers,John P F A, AU - Bemelmans,Bart L H, AU - Hilbrands,Lukas B, PY - 2008/3/21/pubmed PY - 2008/4/25/medline PY - 2008/3/21/entrez SP - 1029 EP - 34 JF - BJU international JO - BJU Int VL - 101 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To explore the role of bladder capacity, bladder pain, dysfunctional voiding, urgency, urinary tract infections (UTIs), and urinary output as potential causes of frequency and nocturia after renal transplantation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data were gathered from 52 adult renal transplant patients (35 men and 17 women, mean age 49 years), using a written questionnaire, medical records, frequency/volume charts, and urinary cultures. The mean time between transplantation and data collection was 5 months. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used for the simultaneous assessment of direct and indirect relationships between explanatory variables and voiding frequency. RESULTS: Frequency and nocturia were found in 54% and 60% of the study population, respectively. Frequency was directly associated with a small bladder capacity, bladder pain, urgency, and a high daytime urine volume, and indirectly by UTIs (via urgency and bladder pain). Nocturia was associated with high nocturnal urine volume, small bladder capacity and dysfunctional voiding. A quarter of the patients had small bladders and another quarter had large bladders, the latter being associated with nocturnal polyuria. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of frequency, especially when accompanied by bladder pain, might aid the physician to identify patients with small bladders. The presence of nocturia can be the result of a high nocturnal urine volume, which increases the risk of bladder enlargement. Because both abnormal bladder conditions can contribute to graft dysfunction, we recommend a urological follow-up after renal transplantation, using frequency/volume charts. SN - 1464-410X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18353158/Causes_of_frequency_and_nocturia_after_renal_transplantation_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-410X.2007.07292.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -