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Nonshared environmental influences on teacher-reported behaviour problems: monozygotic twin differences in perceptions of the classroom.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jun; 49(6):646-53.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The identification of specific nonshared environments responsible for the variance in behaviour problems is a key challenge.

METHODS

Nonshared environmental influences on teacher-reported behaviour problems were explored independently of genetics using the monozygotic (MZ) twin differences design. Six aspects of classroom environment were rated by a representative sample of 570 nine-year-old MZ twins in the UK in different classrooms and were related to their different teachers' reports of prosocial behaviour, hyperactivity, conduct problems, peer problems and emotional symptoms.

RESULTS

Within-pair differences in perceptions of the classroom were significantly correlated with teacher-reported behaviour problems, indicating that children with less favourable perceptions of their classroom environment were reported by their teachers as less prosocial, more hyperactive, and to have more conduct and peer problems. Socioeconomic status did not significantly moderate any of these relationships. However, parent-reported household chaos was a significant moderator.

CONCLUSIONS

The classroom environment is related to behaviour problems even when genetic factors are held constant. Classroom environment is more strongly associated with behaviour problems when the home environment is more chaotic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, King's College London, UK. b.oliver@iop.kcl.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18355217

Citation

Oliver, Bonamy R., et al. "Nonshared Environmental Influences On Teacher-reported Behaviour Problems: Monozygotic Twin Differences in Perceptions of the Classroom." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, vol. 49, no. 6, 2008, pp. 646-53.
Oliver BR, Pike A, Plomin R. Nonshared environmental influences on teacher-reported behaviour problems: monozygotic twin differences in perceptions of the classroom. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008;49(6):646-53.
Oliver, B. R., Pike, A., & Plomin, R. (2008). Nonshared environmental influences on teacher-reported behaviour problems: monozygotic twin differences in perceptions of the classroom. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 49(6), 646-53. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01891.x
Oliver BR, Pike A, Plomin R. Nonshared Environmental Influences On Teacher-reported Behaviour Problems: Monozygotic Twin Differences in Perceptions of the Classroom. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008;49(6):646-53. PubMed PMID: 18355217.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nonshared environmental influences on teacher-reported behaviour problems: monozygotic twin differences in perceptions of the classroom. AU - Oliver,Bonamy R, AU - Pike,Alison, AU - Plomin,Robert, Y1 - 2008/03/17/ PY - 2008/3/22/pubmed PY - 2008/7/9/medline PY - 2008/3/22/entrez SP - 646 EP - 53 JF - Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines JO - J Child Psychol Psychiatry VL - 49 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The identification of specific nonshared environments responsible for the variance in behaviour problems is a key challenge. METHODS: Nonshared environmental influences on teacher-reported behaviour problems were explored independently of genetics using the monozygotic (MZ) twin differences design. Six aspects of classroom environment were rated by a representative sample of 570 nine-year-old MZ twins in the UK in different classrooms and were related to their different teachers' reports of prosocial behaviour, hyperactivity, conduct problems, peer problems and emotional symptoms. RESULTS: Within-pair differences in perceptions of the classroom were significantly correlated with teacher-reported behaviour problems, indicating that children with less favourable perceptions of their classroom environment were reported by their teachers as less prosocial, more hyperactive, and to have more conduct and peer problems. Socioeconomic status did not significantly moderate any of these relationships. However, parent-reported household chaos was a significant moderator. CONCLUSIONS: The classroom environment is related to behaviour problems even when genetic factors are held constant. Classroom environment is more strongly associated with behaviour problems when the home environment is more chaotic. SN - 1469-7610 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18355217/Nonshared_environmental_influences_on_teacher_reported_behaviour_problems:_monozygotic_twin_differences_in_perceptions_of_the_classroom_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01891.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -