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Phylogenetic diversity of bacteria associated with the mucus of Red Sea corals.
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2008 May; 64(2):187-98.FM

Abstract

Coral reefs are the most biodiverse and biologically productive of all marine ecosystems. Corals harbor diverse and abundant prokaryotic communities. However, little is known about the diversity of coral-associated bacterial communities. Mucus is a characteristic product of all corals, forming a coating over their polyps. The coral mucus is a rich substrate for microorganisms. Mucus was collected with a procedure using sterile cotton swabs that minimized contamination of the coral mucus by surrounding seawater. We used molecular techniques to characterize and compare the bacterial assemblages associated with the mucus of the solitary coral Fungia scutaria and the massive coral Platygyra lamellina from the Gulf of Eilat, northern Red Sea. The bacterial communities of the corals F. scutaria and P. lamellina were found to be diverse, with representatives within the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria, as well as the Actinobacteria, Cytophaga-Flavobacter/Flexibacter-Bacteroides group, Firmicutes, Planctomyces, and several unclassified bacteria. However, the total bacterial assemblage of these two corals was different. In contrast to the bacterial communities of corals analyzed in previous studies by culture-based and culture-independent approaches, we found that the bacterial clone libraries of the coral species included a substantial proportion of Actinobacteria. The current study further supports the finding that bacterial communities of coral mucus are diverse.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel. lampery@mail.biu.ac.ilNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18355296

Citation

Lampert, Yael, et al. "Phylogenetic Diversity of Bacteria Associated With the Mucus of Red Sea Corals." FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 64, no. 2, 2008, pp. 187-98.
Lampert Y, Kelman D, Nitzan Y, et al. Phylogenetic diversity of bacteria associated with the mucus of Red Sea corals. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2008;64(2):187-98.
Lampert, Y., Kelman, D., Nitzan, Y., Dubinsky, Z., Behar, A., & Hill, R. T. (2008). Phylogenetic diversity of bacteria associated with the mucus of Red Sea corals. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 64(2), 187-98. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6941.2008.00458.x
Lampert Y, et al. Phylogenetic Diversity of Bacteria Associated With the Mucus of Red Sea Corals. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2008;64(2):187-98. PubMed PMID: 18355296.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Phylogenetic diversity of bacteria associated with the mucus of Red Sea corals. AU - Lampert,Yael, AU - Kelman,Dovi, AU - Nitzan,Yeshayahu, AU - Dubinsky,Zvy, AU - Behar,Adi, AU - Hill,Russell T, Y1 - 2008/03/18/ PY - 2008/3/22/pubmed PY - 2008/6/27/medline PY - 2008/3/22/entrez SP - 187 EP - 98 JF - FEMS microbiology ecology JO - FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. VL - 64 IS - 2 N2 - Coral reefs are the most biodiverse and biologically productive of all marine ecosystems. Corals harbor diverse and abundant prokaryotic communities. However, little is known about the diversity of coral-associated bacterial communities. Mucus is a characteristic product of all corals, forming a coating over their polyps. The coral mucus is a rich substrate for microorganisms. Mucus was collected with a procedure using sterile cotton swabs that minimized contamination of the coral mucus by surrounding seawater. We used molecular techniques to characterize and compare the bacterial assemblages associated with the mucus of the solitary coral Fungia scutaria and the massive coral Platygyra lamellina from the Gulf of Eilat, northern Red Sea. The bacterial communities of the corals F. scutaria and P. lamellina were found to be diverse, with representatives within the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria, as well as the Actinobacteria, Cytophaga-Flavobacter/Flexibacter-Bacteroides group, Firmicutes, Planctomyces, and several unclassified bacteria. However, the total bacterial assemblage of these two corals was different. In contrast to the bacterial communities of corals analyzed in previous studies by culture-based and culture-independent approaches, we found that the bacterial clone libraries of the coral species included a substantial proportion of Actinobacteria. The current study further supports the finding that bacterial communities of coral mucus are diverse. SN - 0168-6496 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18355296/Phylogenetic_diversity_of_bacteria_associated_with_the_mucus_of_Red_Sea_corals_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/femsec/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1574-6941.2008.00458.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -