Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Is television viewing time a marker of a broader pattern of sedentary behavior?
Ann Behav Med 2008; 35(2):245-50AB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Television (TV) viewing time is associated with abnormal glucose metabolism, the metabolic syndrome, and risk of type 2 diabetes; associations are stronger and more consistent in women. One explanation of this difference may be that TV viewing is a marker of an overall pattern of sedentary behavior in women.

PURPOSE

We sought to examine associations of TV viewing time with other sedentary behaviors and with leisure-time physical activity in a large sample of Australian adults.

METHODS

Adults aged between 20 and 65 years (n = 2,046) completed a self-administered questionnaire on TV viewing, five other leisure-time sedentary behaviors, and leisure-time physical activity. Mean adjusted time spent in other sedentary behaviors and in physical activity was compared across TV-time categories previously shown to be associated with abnormal glucose metabolism.

RESULTS

After adjustment for body mass index and socio-demographic variables, women's time spent watching TV was associated positively with time in other sedentary behaviors and negatively with leisure-time physical activity, but no such associations were observed in men.

CONCLUSIONS

TV viewing time may be a robust marker of a sedentary lifestyle in women but not in men. Gender differences in the pattern of sedentary behaviors may explain at least in part the gender differences in the previously reported associations of TV viewing time with biological attributes related to type 2 diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Prevention Research Centre, School of Population Health, The University of Queensland, Level 3, Public Health Building, Brisbane, Queensland 4006, Australia. t.sugiyama@uq.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18357498

Citation

Sugiyama, Takemi, et al. "Is Television Viewing Time a Marker of a Broader Pattern of Sedentary Behavior?" Annals of Behavioral Medicine : a Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 35, no. 2, 2008, pp. 245-50.
Sugiyama T, Healy GN, Dunstan DW, et al. Is television viewing time a marker of a broader pattern of sedentary behavior? Ann Behav Med. 2008;35(2):245-50.
Sugiyama, T., Healy, G. N., Dunstan, D. W., Salmon, J., & Owen, N. (2008). Is television viewing time a marker of a broader pattern of sedentary behavior? Annals of Behavioral Medicine : a Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, 35(2), pp. 245-50. doi:10.1007/s12160-008-9017-z.
Sugiyama T, et al. Is Television Viewing Time a Marker of a Broader Pattern of Sedentary Behavior. Ann Behav Med. 2008;35(2):245-50. PubMed PMID: 18357498.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Is television viewing time a marker of a broader pattern of sedentary behavior? AU - Sugiyama,Takemi, AU - Healy,Genevieve N, AU - Dunstan,David W, AU - Salmon,Jo, AU - Owen,Neville, Y1 - 2008/03/21/ PY - 2007/03/26/received PY - 2008/3/22/pubmed PY - 2008/7/24/medline PY - 2008/3/22/entrez SP - 245 EP - 50 JF - Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine JO - Ann Behav Med VL - 35 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Television (TV) viewing time is associated with abnormal glucose metabolism, the metabolic syndrome, and risk of type 2 diabetes; associations are stronger and more consistent in women. One explanation of this difference may be that TV viewing is a marker of an overall pattern of sedentary behavior in women. PURPOSE: We sought to examine associations of TV viewing time with other sedentary behaviors and with leisure-time physical activity in a large sample of Australian adults. METHODS: Adults aged between 20 and 65 years (n = 2,046) completed a self-administered questionnaire on TV viewing, five other leisure-time sedentary behaviors, and leisure-time physical activity. Mean adjusted time spent in other sedentary behaviors and in physical activity was compared across TV-time categories previously shown to be associated with abnormal glucose metabolism. RESULTS: After adjustment for body mass index and socio-demographic variables, women's time spent watching TV was associated positively with time in other sedentary behaviors and negatively with leisure-time physical activity, but no such associations were observed in men. CONCLUSIONS: TV viewing time may be a robust marker of a sedentary lifestyle in women but not in men. Gender differences in the pattern of sedentary behaviors may explain at least in part the gender differences in the previously reported associations of TV viewing time with biological attributes related to type 2 diabetes. SN - 1532-4796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18357498/Is_television_viewing_time_a_marker_of_a_broader_pattern_of_sedentary_behavior L2 - https://academic.oup.com/abm/article-lookup/doi/10.1007/s12160-008-9017-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -