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A randomized controlled trial of relaxation training to reduce hot flashes in women with primary breast cancer.

Abstract

Hot flashes are experienced by about 52% of perimenopausal women. After breast cancer, this may increase to 70%. The use of hormone replacement therapy is not recommended in women who have had breast cancer; therefore, alternatives are required to help relieve hot flashes. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy of relaxation training in reducing the incidence of hot flashes in women with primary breast cancer. This was a randomized controlled trial of 150 women with primary breast cancer who experienced hot flashes. The intervention group received a single relaxation training session and was instructed to use practice tapes on a daily basis at home for one month; the control group received no intervention. Outcomes were incidence and severity of flashes using a diary and validated measures of anxiety and quality of life. The incidence and severity of hot flashes, as recorded by diaries, each significantly declined over one month (P<0.001 and P=0.01, respectively), compared with the control group. Distress caused by flashes also significantly declined in the treatment group over one month (P=0.01), compared with the control group. There were no significant differences between the treatment group and the control group at three months and no changes in anxiety or quality-of-life measures. Relaxation may be a useful component of a program of measures to relieve hot flashes in women with primary breast cancer.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    School of Nursing & Midwifery, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. dfenlon@soton.ac.uk <dfenlon@soton.ac.uk>

    ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Breast Neoplasms
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Hot Flashes
    Humans
    Incidence
    Middle Aged
    Patient Satisfaction
    Relaxation Therapy
    Treatment Outcome

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18359433

    Citation

    Fenlon, Deborah R., et al. "A Randomized Controlled Trial of Relaxation Training to Reduce Hot Flashes in Women With Primary Breast Cancer." Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, vol. 35, no. 4, 2008, pp. 397-405.
    Fenlon DR, Corner JL, Haviland JS. A randomized controlled trial of relaxation training to reduce hot flashes in women with primary breast cancer. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2008;35(4):397-405.
    Fenlon, D. R., Corner, J. L., & Haviland, J. S. (2008). A randomized controlled trial of relaxation training to reduce hot flashes in women with primary breast cancer. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 35(4), pp. 397-405. doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2007.05.014.
    Fenlon DR, Corner JL, Haviland JS. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Relaxation Training to Reduce Hot Flashes in Women With Primary Breast Cancer. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2008;35(4):397-405. PubMed PMID: 18359433.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - A randomized controlled trial of relaxation training to reduce hot flashes in women with primary breast cancer. AU - Fenlon,Deborah R, AU - Corner,Jessica L, AU - Haviland,Joanne S, PY - 2006/12/11/received PY - 2007/05/08/revised PY - 2007/05/10/accepted PY - 2008/3/25/pubmed PY - 2008/6/19/medline PY - 2008/3/25/entrez SP - 397 EP - 405 JF - Journal of pain and symptom management JO - J Pain Symptom Manage VL - 35 IS - 4 N2 - Hot flashes are experienced by about 52% of perimenopausal women. After breast cancer, this may increase to 70%. The use of hormone replacement therapy is not recommended in women who have had breast cancer; therefore, alternatives are required to help relieve hot flashes. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy of relaxation training in reducing the incidence of hot flashes in women with primary breast cancer. This was a randomized controlled trial of 150 women with primary breast cancer who experienced hot flashes. The intervention group received a single relaxation training session and was instructed to use practice tapes on a daily basis at home for one month; the control group received no intervention. Outcomes were incidence and severity of flashes using a diary and validated measures of anxiety and quality of life. The incidence and severity of hot flashes, as recorded by diaries, each significantly declined over one month (P<0.001 and P=0.01, respectively), compared with the control group. Distress caused by flashes also significantly declined in the treatment group over one month (P=0.01), compared with the control group. There were no significant differences between the treatment group and the control group at three months and no changes in anxiety or quality-of-life measures. Relaxation may be a useful component of a program of measures to relieve hot flashes in women with primary breast cancer. SN - 0885-3924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18359433/A_randomized_controlled_trial_of_relaxation_training_to_reduce_hot_flashes_in_women_with_primary_breast_cancer_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0885-3924(07)00753-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -