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Role of multihospital system membership in electronic medical record adoption.
Health Care Manage Rev. 2008 Apr-Jun; 33(2):169-77.HC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Health information technology (HIT) is designed to help reduce medical errors and improve quality of care and efficiency by providing the right information for the right patients in the right place at the right time. Nevertheless, substantial variation currently exists in the adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) resulting in differences in hospital HIT capacity.

PURPOSE

The purpose of this article is to examine the impact of different types of multihospital system affiliation on EMR adoption in hospitals in the United States.

METHODOLOGY

A cross-sectional design was used with a sample of 4,017 hospitals in the United States. Secondary data were retrieved from the Health Information and Management Systems Society Analytics Database. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the impact of multihospital system affiliation on EMR level of adoption.

FINDINGS

The mean EMR adoption level varies significantly between independent hospitals and hospitals owned by a system for small hospitals. After adjusting for the number of operating rooms, the number of emergency room visits, and the number of hospital total full-time equivalent staff, small hospitals owned by multihospital systems were associated with 0.25 higher mean EMR adoption level (p < .05) than independent hospitals and no significant relationship was observed for hospitals that were leased/managed by a system. There was no significant effect of multihospital system membership on EMR level of adoption for medium and large hospitals.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS

Small hospitals owned by multihospital systems had a significantly higher EMR level compared with independent hospitals. These findings have significant implications for small hospitals that are struggling to improve their HIT capacity. Smaller hospitals in ownership arrangements with larger health care systems have an advantage over small independent hospitals in HIT capacity possibly because of the greater availability of capital, access to shared HIT capacity, and other resources including technical expertise.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA. penli@mail.med.upenn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18360167

Citation

Li, Pengxiang, et al. "Role of Multihospital System Membership in Electronic Medical Record Adoption." Health Care Management Review, vol. 33, no. 2, 2008, pp. 169-77.
Li P, Bahensky JA, Jaana M, et al. Role of multihospital system membership in electronic medical record adoption. Health Care Manage Rev. 2008;33(2):169-77.
Li, P., Bahensky, J. A., Jaana, M., & Ward, M. M. (2008). Role of multihospital system membership in electronic medical record adoption. Health Care Management Review, 33(2), 169-77. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.HMR.0000304502.20179.32
Li P, et al. Role of Multihospital System Membership in Electronic Medical Record Adoption. Health Care Manage Rev. 2008 Apr-Jun;33(2):169-77. PubMed PMID: 18360167.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of multihospital system membership in electronic medical record adoption. AU - Li,Pengxiang, AU - Bahensky,James A, AU - Jaana,Mirou, AU - Ward,Marcia M, PY - 2008/3/25/pubmed PY - 2008/4/30/medline PY - 2008/3/25/entrez SP - 169 EP - 77 JF - Health care management review JO - Health Care Manage Rev VL - 33 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Health information technology (HIT) is designed to help reduce medical errors and improve quality of care and efficiency by providing the right information for the right patients in the right place at the right time. Nevertheless, substantial variation currently exists in the adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) resulting in differences in hospital HIT capacity. PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to examine the impact of different types of multihospital system affiliation on EMR adoption in hospitals in the United States. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional design was used with a sample of 4,017 hospitals in the United States. Secondary data were retrieved from the Health Information and Management Systems Society Analytics Database. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the impact of multihospital system affiliation on EMR level of adoption. FINDINGS: The mean EMR adoption level varies significantly between independent hospitals and hospitals owned by a system for small hospitals. After adjusting for the number of operating rooms, the number of emergency room visits, and the number of hospital total full-time equivalent staff, small hospitals owned by multihospital systems were associated with 0.25 higher mean EMR adoption level (p < .05) than independent hospitals and no significant relationship was observed for hospitals that were leased/managed by a system. There was no significant effect of multihospital system membership on EMR level of adoption for medium and large hospitals. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Small hospitals owned by multihospital systems had a significantly higher EMR level compared with independent hospitals. These findings have significant implications for small hospitals that are struggling to improve their HIT capacity. Smaller hospitals in ownership arrangements with larger health care systems have an advantage over small independent hospitals in HIT capacity possibly because of the greater availability of capital, access to shared HIT capacity, and other resources including technical expertise. SN - 1550-5030 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18360167/Role_of_multihospital_system_membership_in_electronic_medical_record_adoption_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.HMR.0000304502.20179.32 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -