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Pediatric facial fractures: current national incidence, distribution, and health care resource use.
J Craniofac Surg. 2008 Mar; 19(2):339-49; discussion 350.JC

Abstract

To date, reports on the incidence and distribution of pediatric facial fractures have been inconsistent and have originated only from institutional studies. The need for current national data exists. We examined the Kids' Inpatient Database and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to obtain national information on facial fracture discharges from 1997 to 2003. Data showed that pediatric patients (age, 0-17 years) make up 14.7% of all facial fractures, with children aged 1 to 4 years comprising only 5.6% of the total and children 15 to 17 years old making up more than half the group. The male-to-female ratio was 2.5. Significantly lengthier hospitalizations were observed with female patients, Medicaid insurance, teaching hospitals, government hospitals, and metropolitan hospitals. Significantly higher charges were associated with patients aged 1 to 4 years, Medicaid insurance, Western US geography, teaching hospitals, metropolitan hospitals, and children's hospitals. During the 6-year period of this study, there was a trend toward (1) increased hospital charges (with stable costs), (2) more patients treated at teaching hospitals, and (3) a convergence in length of stay between hospitals with differing ownerships (with government hospitals having progressively shorter hospitalizations, whereas private for-profit hospitals have progressively lengthier hospitalizations). The incidence of facial fractures in children is small yet significant and has remained stable during the past few decades. Certain patient populations are prone to facial fractures, and various patient and hospital factors are associated with lengthier and more expensive hospitalizations. An understanding of disparities in resource use among various patient, hospital, and geographic settings is critical for physicians and policy makers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18362709

Citation

Vyas, Raj M., et al. "Pediatric Facial Fractures: Current National Incidence, Distribution, and Health Care Resource Use." The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, vol. 19, no. 2, 2008, pp. 339-49; discussion 350.
Vyas RM, Dickinson BP, Wasson KL, et al. Pediatric facial fractures: current national incidence, distribution, and health care resource use. J Craniofac Surg. 2008;19(2):339-49; discussion 350.
Vyas, R. M., Dickinson, B. P., Wasson, K. L., Roostaeian, J., & Bradley, J. P. (2008). Pediatric facial fractures: current national incidence, distribution, and health care resource use. The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, 19(2), 339-49; discussion 350. https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e31814fb5e3
Vyas RM, et al. Pediatric Facial Fractures: Current National Incidence, Distribution, and Health Care Resource Use. J Craniofac Surg. 2008;19(2):339-49; discussion 350. PubMed PMID: 18362709.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pediatric facial fractures: current national incidence, distribution, and health care resource use. AU - Vyas,Raj M, AU - Dickinson,Brian P, AU - Wasson,Kristy L, AU - Roostaeian,Jason, AU - Bradley,James P, PY - 2008/3/26/pubmed PY - 2008/6/27/medline PY - 2008/3/26/entrez SP - 339-49; discussion 350 JF - The Journal of craniofacial surgery JO - J Craniofac Surg VL - 19 IS - 2 N2 - To date, reports on the incidence and distribution of pediatric facial fractures have been inconsistent and have originated only from institutional studies. The need for current national data exists. We examined the Kids' Inpatient Database and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to obtain national information on facial fracture discharges from 1997 to 2003. Data showed that pediatric patients (age, 0-17 years) make up 14.7% of all facial fractures, with children aged 1 to 4 years comprising only 5.6% of the total and children 15 to 17 years old making up more than half the group. The male-to-female ratio was 2.5. Significantly lengthier hospitalizations were observed with female patients, Medicaid insurance, teaching hospitals, government hospitals, and metropolitan hospitals. Significantly higher charges were associated with patients aged 1 to 4 years, Medicaid insurance, Western US geography, teaching hospitals, metropolitan hospitals, and children's hospitals. During the 6-year period of this study, there was a trend toward (1) increased hospital charges (with stable costs), (2) more patients treated at teaching hospitals, and (3) a convergence in length of stay between hospitals with differing ownerships (with government hospitals having progressively shorter hospitalizations, whereas private for-profit hospitals have progressively lengthier hospitalizations). The incidence of facial fractures in children is small yet significant and has remained stable during the past few decades. Certain patient populations are prone to facial fractures, and various patient and hospital factors are associated with lengthier and more expensive hospitalizations. An understanding of disparities in resource use among various patient, hospital, and geographic settings is critical for physicians and policy makers. SN - 1049-2275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18362709/Pediatric_facial_fractures:_current_national_incidence_distribution_and_health_care_resource_use_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e31814fb5e3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -