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Body mass, diabetes and smoking, and endometrial cancer risk: a follow-up study.
Br J Cancer. 2008 May 06; 98(9):1582-5.BJ

Abstract

We examined the relationship of body mass index (BMI), diabetes and smoking to endometrial cancer risk in a cohort of 36 761 Norwegian women during 15.7 years of follow-up. In multivariable analyses of 222 incident cases of endometrial cancer, identified by linkage to the Norwegian Cancer Registry, there was a strong increase in risk with increasing BMI (P-trend <0.001). Compared to the reference (BMI 20-24 kg m(-2)), the adjusted relative risk (RR) was 0.53 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.19-1.47) for BMI<20 kg m(-2), 4.28 (95% CI: 2.58-7.09) for BMI of 35-39 kg m(-2) and 6.36 (95% CI: 3.08-13.16) for BMI>or=40 kg m(-2). Women with known diabetes at baseline were at three-fold higher risk (RR 3.13, 95% CI: 1.92-5.11) than those without diabetes; women who reported current smoking at baseline were at reduced risk compared to never smokers (RR 0.55, 95% CI: 0.35-0.86). The strong linear positive association of BMI with endometrial cancer risk and a strongly increased risk among women with diabetes suggest that any increase in body mass in the female population will increase endometrial cancer incidence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Medical Faculty, Division of Akershus University Hospital, 1478 Lørenskog, Norway. kristina.lindemann@ahus.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18362938

Citation

Lindemann, K, et al. "Body Mass, Diabetes and Smoking, and Endometrial Cancer Risk: a Follow-up Study." British Journal of Cancer, vol. 98, no. 9, 2008, pp. 1582-5.
Lindemann K, Vatten LJ, Ellstrøm-Engh M, et al. Body mass, diabetes and smoking, and endometrial cancer risk: a follow-up study. Br J Cancer. 2008;98(9):1582-5.
Lindemann, K., Vatten, L. J., Ellstrøm-Engh, M., & Eskild, A. (2008). Body mass, diabetes and smoking, and endometrial cancer risk: a follow-up study. British Journal of Cancer, 98(9), 1582-5. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6604313
Lindemann K, et al. Body Mass, Diabetes and Smoking, and Endometrial Cancer Risk: a Follow-up Study. Br J Cancer. 2008 May 6;98(9):1582-5. PubMed PMID: 18362938.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass, diabetes and smoking, and endometrial cancer risk: a follow-up study. AU - Lindemann,K, AU - Vatten,L J, AU - Ellstrøm-Engh,M, AU - Eskild,A, Y1 - 2008/03/25/ PY - 2008/3/26/pubmed PY - 2008/5/28/medline PY - 2008/3/26/entrez SP - 1582 EP - 5 JF - British journal of cancer JO - Br. J. Cancer VL - 98 IS - 9 N2 - We examined the relationship of body mass index (BMI), diabetes and smoking to endometrial cancer risk in a cohort of 36 761 Norwegian women during 15.7 years of follow-up. In multivariable analyses of 222 incident cases of endometrial cancer, identified by linkage to the Norwegian Cancer Registry, there was a strong increase in risk with increasing BMI (P-trend <0.001). Compared to the reference (BMI 20-24 kg m(-2)), the adjusted relative risk (RR) was 0.53 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.19-1.47) for BMI<20 kg m(-2), 4.28 (95% CI: 2.58-7.09) for BMI of 35-39 kg m(-2) and 6.36 (95% CI: 3.08-13.16) for BMI>or=40 kg m(-2). Women with known diabetes at baseline were at three-fold higher risk (RR 3.13, 95% CI: 1.92-5.11) than those without diabetes; women who reported current smoking at baseline were at reduced risk compared to never smokers (RR 0.55, 95% CI: 0.35-0.86). The strong linear positive association of BMI with endometrial cancer risk and a strongly increased risk among women with diabetes suggest that any increase in body mass in the female population will increase endometrial cancer incidence. SN - 1532-1827 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18362938/Body_mass_diabetes_and_smoking_and_endometrial_cancer_risk:_a_follow_up_study_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6604313 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -