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Cyberbullying: its nature and impact in secondary school pupils.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2008; 49(4):376-85JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Cyberbullying describes bullying using mobile phones and the internet. Most previous studies have focused on the prevalence of text message and email bullying.

METHODS

Two surveys with pupils aged 11-16 years: (1) 92 pupils from 14 schools, supplemented by focus groups; (2) 533 pupils from 5 schools, to assess the generalisability of findings from the first study, and investigate relationships of cyberbullying to general internet use. Both studies differentiated cyberbullying inside and outside of school, and 7 media of cyberbullying.

RESULTS

Both studies found cyberbullying less frequent than traditional bullying, but appreciable, and reported more outside of school than inside. Phone call and text message bullying were most prevalent, with instant messaging bullying in the second study; their impact was perceived as comparable to traditional bullying. Mobile phone/video clip bullying, while rarer, was perceived to have more negative impact. Age and gender differences varied between the two studies. Study 1 found that most cyberbullying was done by one or a few students, usually from the same year group. It often just lasted about a week, but sometimes much longer. The second study found that being a cybervictim, but not a cyberbully, correlated with internet use; many cybervictims were traditional 'bully-victims'. Pupils recommended blocking/avoiding messages, and telling someone, as the best coping strategies; but many cybervictims had told nobody about it.

CONCLUSIONS

Cyberbullying is an important new kind of bullying, with some different characteristics from traditional bullying. Much happens outside school. Implications for research and practical action are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit for School and Family Studies, Goldsmiths College, University of London, UK. p.smith@gold,.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18363945

Citation

Smith, Peter K., et al. "Cyberbullying: Its Nature and Impact in Secondary School Pupils." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, vol. 49, no. 4, 2008, pp. 376-85.
Smith PK, Mahdavi J, Carvalho M, et al. Cyberbullying: its nature and impact in secondary school pupils. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008;49(4):376-85.
Smith, P. K., Mahdavi, J., Carvalho, M., Fisher, S., Russell, S., & Tippett, N. (2008). Cyberbullying: its nature and impact in secondary school pupils. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 49(4), pp. 376-85. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2007.01846.x.
Smith PK, et al. Cyberbullying: Its Nature and Impact in Secondary School Pupils. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008;49(4):376-85. PubMed PMID: 18363945.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cyberbullying: its nature and impact in secondary school pupils. AU - Smith,Peter K, AU - Mahdavi,Jess, AU - Carvalho,Manuel, AU - Fisher,Sonja, AU - Russell,Shanette, AU - Tippett,Neil, PY - 2008/3/28/pubmed PY - 2008/4/15/medline PY - 2008/3/28/entrez SP - 376 EP - 85 JF - Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines JO - J Child Psychol Psychiatry VL - 49 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Cyberbullying describes bullying using mobile phones and the internet. Most previous studies have focused on the prevalence of text message and email bullying. METHODS: Two surveys with pupils aged 11-16 years: (1) 92 pupils from 14 schools, supplemented by focus groups; (2) 533 pupils from 5 schools, to assess the generalisability of findings from the first study, and investigate relationships of cyberbullying to general internet use. Both studies differentiated cyberbullying inside and outside of school, and 7 media of cyberbullying. RESULTS: Both studies found cyberbullying less frequent than traditional bullying, but appreciable, and reported more outside of school than inside. Phone call and text message bullying were most prevalent, with instant messaging bullying in the second study; their impact was perceived as comparable to traditional bullying. Mobile phone/video clip bullying, while rarer, was perceived to have more negative impact. Age and gender differences varied between the two studies. Study 1 found that most cyberbullying was done by one or a few students, usually from the same year group. It often just lasted about a week, but sometimes much longer. The second study found that being a cybervictim, but not a cyberbully, correlated with internet use; many cybervictims were traditional 'bully-victims'. Pupils recommended blocking/avoiding messages, and telling someone, as the best coping strategies; but many cybervictims had told nobody about it. CONCLUSIONS: Cyberbullying is an important new kind of bullying, with some different characteristics from traditional bullying. Much happens outside school. Implications for research and practical action are discussed. SN - 1469-7610 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18363945/Cyberbullying:_its_nature_and_impact_in_secondary_school_pupils_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2007.01846.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -