Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Co-existing micronutrient deficiencies among stunted Cambodian infants and toddlers.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008; 17(1):72-9.AP

Abstract

The prevalence of malnutrition in Cambodia is among the highest in Southeast Asia, and diarrhea and pneumonia are the leading causes of death among children. Whether these adverse health outcomes are associated with co-existing micronutrient deficiencies is uncertain. We have determined the prevalence of anaemia, as well as iron, zinc, and vitamin A deficiency and their co-existence among stunted children (77 females; 110 males) aged 6-36 mos. Non-fasting morning venipuncture blood samples were taken and analyzed for haemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin (via IMx system), retinol (via HPLC), and Zn (via AAS), C-reactive protein (CRP) (via turbidimetry) and Hb type (AA, AE, or EE) (via Hb gel electrophoresis). Children with CRP>or=5.0 mg/L (n=34) were excluded. Zinc deficiency defined as serum Zn<9.9 micromol/L had the highest prevalence (73.2%), followed by anaemia (71%) (Hb<110 g/L), and then vitamin A deficiency (28.4%) (serum retinol<0.70 micromol/L). Of the anaemic children, only 21% had iron deficiency anaemia, and 6% had depleted iron stores. Age, log serum ferritin, and Hb type were significant predictors of Hb in the AA and AE children. Serum retinol was unrelated to haemoglobin or serum zinc. The prevalence of two or more micronutrient deficiencies (low Hb, serum retinol, and/or serum zinc) was 44%. Nearly 10% had low values for all three indices, and 18% had just one low value. In conclusion, anaemia, and deficiencies of iron, zinc, and vitamin A are severe public health problems among these stunted Cambodian children. Intervention strategies addressing multiple micronutrient deficiencies are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18364330

Citation

Anderson, Victoria P., et al. "Co-existing Micronutrient Deficiencies Among Stunted Cambodian Infants and Toddlers." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 17, no. 1, 2008, pp. 72-9.
Anderson VP, Jack S, Monchy D, et al. Co-existing micronutrient deficiencies among stunted Cambodian infants and toddlers. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17(1):72-9.
Anderson, V. P., Jack, S., Monchy, D., Hem, N., Hok, P., Bailey, K. B., & Gibson, R. S. (2008). Co-existing micronutrient deficiencies among stunted Cambodian infants and toddlers. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 17(1), 72-9.
Anderson VP, et al. Co-existing Micronutrient Deficiencies Among Stunted Cambodian Infants and Toddlers. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17(1):72-9. PubMed PMID: 18364330.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Co-existing micronutrient deficiencies among stunted Cambodian infants and toddlers. AU - Anderson,Victoria P, AU - Jack,Susan, AU - Monchy,Didier, AU - Hem,Neang, AU - Hok,Phearom, AU - Bailey,Karl B, AU - Gibson,Rosalind S, PY - 2008/3/28/pubmed PY - 2008/9/17/medline PY - 2008/3/28/entrez SP - 72 EP - 9 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - The prevalence of malnutrition in Cambodia is among the highest in Southeast Asia, and diarrhea and pneumonia are the leading causes of death among children. Whether these adverse health outcomes are associated with co-existing micronutrient deficiencies is uncertain. We have determined the prevalence of anaemia, as well as iron, zinc, and vitamin A deficiency and their co-existence among stunted children (77 females; 110 males) aged 6-36 mos. Non-fasting morning venipuncture blood samples were taken and analyzed for haemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin (via IMx system), retinol (via HPLC), and Zn (via AAS), C-reactive protein (CRP) (via turbidimetry) and Hb type (AA, AE, or EE) (via Hb gel electrophoresis). Children with CRP>or=5.0 mg/L (n=34) were excluded. Zinc deficiency defined as serum Zn<9.9 micromol/L had the highest prevalence (73.2%), followed by anaemia (71%) (Hb<110 g/L), and then vitamin A deficiency (28.4%) (serum retinol<0.70 micromol/L). Of the anaemic children, only 21% had iron deficiency anaemia, and 6% had depleted iron stores. Age, log serum ferritin, and Hb type were significant predictors of Hb in the AA and AE children. Serum retinol was unrelated to haemoglobin or serum zinc. The prevalence of two or more micronutrient deficiencies (low Hb, serum retinol, and/or serum zinc) was 44%. Nearly 10% had low values for all three indices, and 18% had just one low value. In conclusion, anaemia, and deficiencies of iron, zinc, and vitamin A are severe public health problems among these stunted Cambodian children. Intervention strategies addressing multiple micronutrient deficiencies are needed. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18364330/Co_existing_micronutrient_deficiencies_among_stunted_Cambodian_infants_and_toddlers_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/17/1/72.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -