Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Laboratory evaluation and field application of roadside oral fluid collectors and drug testing devices.
Ther Drug Monit. 2008 Apr; 30(2):188-95.TD

Abstract

This study was a part of a collaborative U.S./E.U. international research effort (Roadside Testing Assessment, ROSITA II) to assess illegal drug use among motor vehicle operators suspected of driving while under the influence of drugs and to evaluate the effectiveness of point-of-collection oral fluid drug detection technologies. A goal of the study was to assess commercial oral fluid drug testing devices for potential use in law enforcement. Ten devices were evaluated in the laboratory for their ability to meet manufacturers' claimed (and proposed) cutoff concentrations for the detection of amphetamine(s), cocaine/metabolite, opiates, cannabinoids, and benzodiazepines (2 devices). The field study portion of the research was conducted in major cities in the United States and Western Europe by teams of scientists working in collaboration with the local police. In Salt Lake City, Utah, the Drugwipe, Securetec, Ottobrunn, Germany (Securetec) oral fluids drug testing device was also evaluated in the field by testing suspected drug-impaired drivers. During the initial phase of the field study, 40 subjects were recruited. Drugwipe results were compared with laboratory-based immunoassay and mass spectrometry results and demonstrated that calculated sensitivities were between 75% and 100% depending on drug class. Specificities varied from 36% for cannabinoids to over 95% for opiates. During the second phase of the field study, 267 subjects were recruited. The Drugwipe sensitivities were 36.4%, 35.9%, 42.9%, and 7.7%, respectively, for amphetamine(s), cocaine, opiates, and cannabinoids. The Drugwipe specificities were 99.2%, 97.4%, 99.6%, and 99.6%, respectively, for amphetamine(s), cocaine, opiates, and cannabinoids. Drugwipe failed to meet the study criteria for acceptable device performance, required performance sensitivities, and specificities 90% or greater.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research and Development, Ameritox, LTD, Midland, TX 79705, USA. denny.crouch@ameritox.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18367979

Citation

Crouch, Dennis J., et al. "Laboratory Evaluation and Field Application of Roadside Oral Fluid Collectors and Drug Testing Devices." Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, vol. 30, no. 2, 2008, pp. 188-95.
Crouch DJ, Walsh JM, Cangianelli L, et al. Laboratory evaluation and field application of roadside oral fluid collectors and drug testing devices. Ther Drug Monit. 2008;30(2):188-95.
Crouch, D. J., Walsh, J. M., Cangianelli, L., & Quintela, O. (2008). Laboratory evaluation and field application of roadside oral fluid collectors and drug testing devices. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, 30(2), 188-95. https://doi.org/10.1097/FTD.0b013e3181679249
Crouch DJ, et al. Laboratory Evaluation and Field Application of Roadside Oral Fluid Collectors and Drug Testing Devices. Ther Drug Monit. 2008;30(2):188-95. PubMed PMID: 18367979.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Laboratory evaluation and field application of roadside oral fluid collectors and drug testing devices. AU - Crouch,Dennis J, AU - Walsh,J Michael, AU - Cangianelli,Leo, AU - Quintela,Oscar, PY - 2008/3/28/pubmed PY - 2008/7/12/medline PY - 2008/3/28/entrez SP - 188 EP - 95 JF - Therapeutic drug monitoring JO - Ther Drug Monit VL - 30 IS - 2 N2 - This study was a part of a collaborative U.S./E.U. international research effort (Roadside Testing Assessment, ROSITA II) to assess illegal drug use among motor vehicle operators suspected of driving while under the influence of drugs and to evaluate the effectiveness of point-of-collection oral fluid drug detection technologies. A goal of the study was to assess commercial oral fluid drug testing devices for potential use in law enforcement. Ten devices were evaluated in the laboratory for their ability to meet manufacturers' claimed (and proposed) cutoff concentrations for the detection of amphetamine(s), cocaine/metabolite, opiates, cannabinoids, and benzodiazepines (2 devices). The field study portion of the research was conducted in major cities in the United States and Western Europe by teams of scientists working in collaboration with the local police. In Salt Lake City, Utah, the Drugwipe, Securetec, Ottobrunn, Germany (Securetec) oral fluids drug testing device was also evaluated in the field by testing suspected drug-impaired drivers. During the initial phase of the field study, 40 subjects were recruited. Drugwipe results were compared with laboratory-based immunoassay and mass spectrometry results and demonstrated that calculated sensitivities were between 75% and 100% depending on drug class. Specificities varied from 36% for cannabinoids to over 95% for opiates. During the second phase of the field study, 267 subjects were recruited. The Drugwipe sensitivities were 36.4%, 35.9%, 42.9%, and 7.7%, respectively, for amphetamine(s), cocaine, opiates, and cannabinoids. The Drugwipe specificities were 99.2%, 97.4%, 99.6%, and 99.6%, respectively, for amphetamine(s), cocaine, opiates, and cannabinoids. Drugwipe failed to meet the study criteria for acceptable device performance, required performance sensitivities, and specificities 90% or greater. SN - 0163-4356 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18367979/Laboratory_evaluation_and_field_application_of_roadside_oral_fluid_collectors_and_drug_testing_devices_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/FTD.0b013e3181679249 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -