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Wild bird surveillance for the avian influenza virus.
Methods Mol Biol 2008; 436:85-97MM

Abstract

Avian influenza (AI) viruses have been isolated from a wide diversity of free-living avian species representing several orders. Isolations are most frequently reported from aquatic birds in the Orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes, which are believed to be the reservoirs for all AI viruses. Since their first recognition in the late 1800 s, AI viruses have been an important agent of disease in poultry and, occasionally, of nongallinaceous birds and humans. However, the recent highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus epidemics have increased the awareness of AI viruses and their potential implications among the scientific community, politicians, and the general public. In response to the spread of HPAI H5N1 viruses to Europe and Africa in 2005-2006, many countries developed surveillance plans to detect AI viruses; a large portion of these sampling efforts was targeted at migratory avian species. This chapter is intended to give general concepts and guidelines for surveillance of the AI virus in wild birds. Separate sections are included for low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) and HPAI H5N1 viruses because the unique biological characteristics of HPAI H5N1 require a modified surveillance plan tailored to these viruses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18370044

Citation

Brown, Justin D., and David E. Stallknecht. "Wild Bird Surveillance for the Avian Influenza Virus." Methods in Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.), vol. 436, 2008, pp. 85-97.
Brown JD, Stallknecht DE. Wild bird surveillance for the avian influenza virus. Methods Mol Biol. 2008;436:85-97.
Brown, J. D., & Stallknecht, D. E. (2008). Wild bird surveillance for the avian influenza virus. Methods in Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.), 436, pp. 85-97. doi:10.1007/978-1-59745-279-3_11.
Brown JD, Stallknecht DE. Wild Bird Surveillance for the Avian Influenza Virus. Methods Mol Biol. 2008;436:85-97. PubMed PMID: 18370044.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Wild bird surveillance for the avian influenza virus. AU - Brown,Justin D, AU - Stallknecht,David E, PY - 2008/3/29/pubmed PY - 2008/7/3/medline PY - 2008/3/29/entrez SP - 85 EP - 97 JF - Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) JO - Methods Mol. Biol. VL - 436 N2 - Avian influenza (AI) viruses have been isolated from a wide diversity of free-living avian species representing several orders. Isolations are most frequently reported from aquatic birds in the Orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes, which are believed to be the reservoirs for all AI viruses. Since their first recognition in the late 1800 s, AI viruses have been an important agent of disease in poultry and, occasionally, of nongallinaceous birds and humans. However, the recent highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus epidemics have increased the awareness of AI viruses and their potential implications among the scientific community, politicians, and the general public. In response to the spread of HPAI H5N1 viruses to Europe and Africa in 2005-2006, many countries developed surveillance plans to detect AI viruses; a large portion of these sampling efforts was targeted at migratory avian species. This chapter is intended to give general concepts and guidelines for surveillance of the AI virus in wild birds. Separate sections are included for low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) and HPAI H5N1 viruses because the unique biological characteristics of HPAI H5N1 require a modified surveillance plan tailored to these viruses. SN - 1064-3745 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18370044/Wild_bird_surveillance_for_the_avian_influenza_virus_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-279-3_11 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -