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Appetitive memory reconsolidation depends upon NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission.
Neurobiol Learn Mem. 2008 Jul; 90(1):147-54.NL

Abstract

Memory persistence is a dynamic process involving the reconsolidation of memories after their reactivation. Reconsolidation impairments have been demonstrated for many types of memories in rats, and signaling at N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors appears often to be a critical pharmacological mechanism. Here we investigated the reconsolidation of appetitive pavlovian memories reinforced by natural rewards. In male Lister Hooded rats, systemic administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-SH-dibenzo{a,d}cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801, 0.1mg/kg i.p.) either before or immediately following a brief memory reactivation session abolished the subsequent acquisition of a new instrumental response with sucrose conditioned reinforcement. However, only when injected prior to memory reactivation was MK-801 effective in disrupting the maintenance of a previously-acquired instrumental response with conditioned reinforcement. These results demonstrate that NMDA receptor-mediated signaling is required for appetitive pavlovian memory reconsolidation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK. jlcl2@cam.ac.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18372198

Citation

Lee, Jonathan L C., and Barry J. Everitt. "Appetitive Memory Reconsolidation Depends Upon NMDA Receptor-mediated Neurotransmission." Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, vol. 90, no. 1, 2008, pp. 147-54.
Lee JL, Everitt BJ. Appetitive memory reconsolidation depends upon NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission. Neurobiol Learn Mem. 2008;90(1):147-54.
Lee, J. L., & Everitt, B. J. (2008). Appetitive memory reconsolidation depends upon NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 90(1), 147-54. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2008.02.004
Lee JL, Everitt BJ. Appetitive Memory Reconsolidation Depends Upon NMDA Receptor-mediated Neurotransmission. Neurobiol Learn Mem. 2008;90(1):147-54. PubMed PMID: 18372198.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Appetitive memory reconsolidation depends upon NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission. AU - Lee,Jonathan L C, AU - Everitt,Barry J, Y1 - 2008/03/26/ PY - 2008/01/07/received PY - 2008/02/04/revised PY - 2008/02/18/accepted PY - 2008/3/29/pubmed PY - 2008/9/4/medline PY - 2008/3/29/entrez SP - 147 EP - 54 JF - Neurobiology of learning and memory JO - Neurobiol Learn Mem VL - 90 IS - 1 N2 - Memory persistence is a dynamic process involving the reconsolidation of memories after their reactivation. Reconsolidation impairments have been demonstrated for many types of memories in rats, and signaling at N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors appears often to be a critical pharmacological mechanism. Here we investigated the reconsolidation of appetitive pavlovian memories reinforced by natural rewards. In male Lister Hooded rats, systemic administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-SH-dibenzo{a,d}cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801, 0.1mg/kg i.p.) either before or immediately following a brief memory reactivation session abolished the subsequent acquisition of a new instrumental response with sucrose conditioned reinforcement. However, only when injected prior to memory reactivation was MK-801 effective in disrupting the maintenance of a previously-acquired instrumental response with conditioned reinforcement. These results demonstrate that NMDA receptor-mediated signaling is required for appetitive pavlovian memory reconsolidation. SN - 1095-9564 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18372198/Appetitive_memory_reconsolidation_depends_upon_NMDA_receptor_mediated_neurotransmission_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1074-7427(08)00031-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -