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Global coronary heart disease risk assessment of individuals with the metabolic syndrome in the U.S.
Diabetes Care 2008; 31(7):1405-9DC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Although metabolic syndrome is related to an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events, individuals with metabolic syndrome encompass a wide range of CHD risk levels. This study describes the distribution of 10-year CHD risk among U.S. adults with metabolic syndrome.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

Metabolic syndrome was defined by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP)/Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III) definition among 4,293 U.S. adults aged 20-79 years in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004. Low-, moderate-, moderately high-, and high-risk statuses were defined as <6, 6 to <10, 10-20, and >20% probability of CHD in 10 years (based on NCEP/ATP III Framingham risk score algorithms), respectively; those with diabetes or preexisting cardiovascular disease were assigned to high-risk status.

RESULTS

The weighted prevalence of metabolic syndrome by NCEP criteria in our study was 29.0% overall (30.0% in men and 27.9% in women, P = 0.28): 38.5% (30.7% men and 46.9% women) were classified as low risk, 8.5% (7.9% men and 9.1% women) were classified as moderate risk, 15.8% (23.4% men and 7.6% women) were classified as moderately high risk, and 37.3% (38.0% men and 36.5% women) were classified as high risk. The proportion at high risk increased with age but was similar among Hispanics, non-Hispanic whites, and non-Hispanic blacks.

CONCLUSIONS

Although many subjects with metabolic syndrome have a low calculated risk for CHD, about half have a moderately high or high risk, reinforcing the need for global risk assessment in individuals with metabolic syndrome to appropriately target intensity of treatment for underlying CHD risk factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Heart Disease Prevention Program, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, California, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18375418

Citation

Hoang, Khiet C., et al. "Global Coronary Heart Disease Risk Assessment of Individuals With the Metabolic Syndrome in the U.S." Diabetes Care, vol. 31, no. 7, 2008, pp. 1405-9.
Hoang KC, Ghandehari H, Lopez VA, et al. Global coronary heart disease risk assessment of individuals with the metabolic syndrome in the U.S. Diabetes Care. 2008;31(7):1405-9.
Hoang, K. C., Ghandehari, H., Lopez, V. A., Barboza, M. G., & Wong, N. D. (2008). Global coronary heart disease risk assessment of individuals with the metabolic syndrome in the U.S. Diabetes Care, 31(7), pp. 1405-9. doi:10.2337/dc07-2087.
Hoang KC, et al. Global Coronary Heart Disease Risk Assessment of Individuals With the Metabolic Syndrome in the U.S. Diabetes Care. 2008;31(7):1405-9. PubMed PMID: 18375418.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Global coronary heart disease risk assessment of individuals with the metabolic syndrome in the U.S. AU - Hoang,Khiet C, AU - Ghandehari,Heli, AU - Lopez,Victor A, AU - Barboza,Michael G, AU - Wong,Nathan D, Y1 - 2008/03/28/ PY - 2008/4/1/pubmed PY - 2008/8/21/medline PY - 2008/4/1/entrez SP - 1405 EP - 9 JF - Diabetes care JO - Diabetes Care VL - 31 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Although metabolic syndrome is related to an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events, individuals with metabolic syndrome encompass a wide range of CHD risk levels. This study describes the distribution of 10-year CHD risk among U.S. adults with metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Metabolic syndrome was defined by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP)/Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III) definition among 4,293 U.S. adults aged 20-79 years in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004. Low-, moderate-, moderately high-, and high-risk statuses were defined as <6, 6 to <10, 10-20, and >20% probability of CHD in 10 years (based on NCEP/ATP III Framingham risk score algorithms), respectively; those with diabetes or preexisting cardiovascular disease were assigned to high-risk status. RESULTS: The weighted prevalence of metabolic syndrome by NCEP criteria in our study was 29.0% overall (30.0% in men and 27.9% in women, P = 0.28): 38.5% (30.7% men and 46.9% women) were classified as low risk, 8.5% (7.9% men and 9.1% women) were classified as moderate risk, 15.8% (23.4% men and 7.6% women) were classified as moderately high risk, and 37.3% (38.0% men and 36.5% women) were classified as high risk. The proportion at high risk increased with age but was similar among Hispanics, non-Hispanic whites, and non-Hispanic blacks. CONCLUSIONS: Although many subjects with metabolic syndrome have a low calculated risk for CHD, about half have a moderately high or high risk, reinforcing the need for global risk assessment in individuals with metabolic syndrome to appropriately target intensity of treatment for underlying CHD risk factors. SN - 1935-5548 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18375418/Global_coronary_heart_disease_risk_assessment_of_individuals_with_the_metabolic_syndrome_in_the_U_S_ L2 - http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=18375418 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -