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Identification of a dietary pattern characterized by high-fat food choices associated with increased risk of breast cancer: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study.
Br J Nutr 2008; 100(5):942-6BJ

Abstract

Epidemiological studies conducted thus far have mainly used a single-nutrient approach which may not be sufficient in detecting diet-cancer relationships. The aim of the study was to examine the association of a food pattern based on explained variations in fatty acid intake by means of reduced rank regression with breast cancer risk. Study participants were female subjects (n 15,351) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study free of cancer at baseline and with complete dietary and outcome information followed for an average of 6.0 years. Among those, 137 incident cases of invasive breast cancer were identified. We identified a food pattern characterized by low consumption of bread, and fruit juices, and high consumption of processed meat, fish, butter and other animal fats, and margarine explaining >42 % of total variation in fatty acid intake (SFA, MUFA, n-3 PUFA, n-6 PUFA). Intake of all four fatty acid fractions was positively associated with the pattern score. Adherence to this food pattern adjusted for covariates was associated with a two-fold risk (hazard ratio 2.00; 95 % CI 1.30, 3.09) of breast cancer comparing extreme tertiles of the pattern score. There was no evidence of effect modification by menopausal status, overweight status and use of hormone replacement therapy, respectively. In conclusion, a food pattern characterized by high-fat food choices was significantly associated with increased risk of breast cancer. Given that the food pattern was high in all fatty acid fractions, we found evidence for total dietary fat rather than for specific fatty acids to be associated with breast cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, Nuthetal 14558, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18377685

Citation

Schulz, Mandy, et al. "Identification of a Dietary Pattern Characterized By High-fat Food Choices Associated With Increased Risk of Breast Cancer: the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 100, no. 5, 2008, pp. 942-6.
Schulz M, Hoffmann K, Weikert C, et al. Identification of a dietary pattern characterized by high-fat food choices associated with increased risk of breast cancer: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study. Br J Nutr. 2008;100(5):942-6.
Schulz, M., Hoffmann, K., Weikert, C., Nöthlings, U., Schulze, M. B., & Boeing, H. (2008). Identification of a dietary pattern characterized by high-fat food choices associated with increased risk of breast cancer: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study. The British Journal of Nutrition, 100(5), pp. 942-6. doi:10.1017/S0007114508966149.
Schulz M, et al. Identification of a Dietary Pattern Characterized By High-fat Food Choices Associated With Increased Risk of Breast Cancer: the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study. Br J Nutr. 2008;100(5):942-6. PubMed PMID: 18377685.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Identification of a dietary pattern characterized by high-fat food choices associated with increased risk of breast cancer: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study. AU - Schulz,Mandy, AU - Hoffmann,Kurt, AU - Weikert,Cornelia, AU - Nöthlings,Ute, AU - Schulze,Matthias B, AU - Boeing,Heiner, PY - 2008/4/2/pubmed PY - 2008/11/19/medline PY - 2008/4/2/entrez SP - 942 EP - 6 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 100 IS - 5 N2 - Epidemiological studies conducted thus far have mainly used a single-nutrient approach which may not be sufficient in detecting diet-cancer relationships. The aim of the study was to examine the association of a food pattern based on explained variations in fatty acid intake by means of reduced rank regression with breast cancer risk. Study participants were female subjects (n 15,351) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study free of cancer at baseline and with complete dietary and outcome information followed for an average of 6.0 years. Among those, 137 incident cases of invasive breast cancer were identified. We identified a food pattern characterized by low consumption of bread, and fruit juices, and high consumption of processed meat, fish, butter and other animal fats, and margarine explaining >42 % of total variation in fatty acid intake (SFA, MUFA, n-3 PUFA, n-6 PUFA). Intake of all four fatty acid fractions was positively associated with the pattern score. Adherence to this food pattern adjusted for covariates was associated with a two-fold risk (hazard ratio 2.00; 95 % CI 1.30, 3.09) of breast cancer comparing extreme tertiles of the pattern score. There was no evidence of effect modification by menopausal status, overweight status and use of hormone replacement therapy, respectively. In conclusion, a food pattern characterized by high-fat food choices was significantly associated with increased risk of breast cancer. Given that the food pattern was high in all fatty acid fractions, we found evidence for total dietary fat rather than for specific fatty acids to be associated with breast cancer risk. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18377685/Identification_of_a_dietary_pattern_characterized_by_high_fat_food_choices_associated_with_increased_risk_of_breast_cancer:_the_European_Prospective_Investigation_into_Cancer_and_Nutrition__EPIC__Potsdam_Study_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114508966149/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -