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Healthy Families New York (HFNY) randomized trial: effects on early child abuse and neglect.
Child Abuse Negl. 2008 Mar; 32(3):295-315.CA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effects of a home visiting program modeled after Healthy Families America on parenting behaviors in the first 2 years of life.

METHODS

A sample of 1173 families at risk for child abuse and neglect who met the criteria for Healthy Families New York (HFNY) was randomly assigned to either an intervention group that was offered HFNY or a control group that was given information and referrals to other services. Data were collected through a review of CPS records, and maternal interviews at baseline and the child's first birthday (90% re-interviewed) and second birthday (85% re-interviewed).

RESULTS

HFNY mothers reported committing one-quarter as many acts of serious abuse at age 2 as control mothers (.01 versus .04, p<.05). Two sets of interactions were tested and found to have significant effects (p<.05). At age 2, young, first-time mothers in the HFNY group who were randomly assigned at 30 weeks of pregnancy or less were less likely than counterparts in the control group to engage in minor physical aggression in the past year (51% versus 70%) and harsh parenting in the past week (41% versus 62%). Among women who were "psychologically vulnerable," HFNY mothers were one-quarter as likely to report engaging in serious abuse and neglect as control mothers (5% versus 19%) at age 2.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggest that who is offered home visitation may be an important factor in explaining the differential effectiveness of home visitation programs. Improved effects may be realized by prioritizing the populations served or by enhancing the model to meet program objectives for hard-to-serve families.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bureau of Evaluation & Research, New York State Office of Children & Family Services, 52 Washington Street, Room 313 South, Rensselaer, NY 12144, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18377991

Citation

DuMont, Kimberly, et al. "Healthy Families New York (HFNY) Randomized Trial: Effects On Early Child Abuse and Neglect." Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 32, no. 3, 2008, pp. 295-315.
DuMont K, Mitchell-Herzfeld S, Greene R, et al. Healthy Families New York (HFNY) randomized trial: effects on early child abuse and neglect. Child Abuse Negl. 2008;32(3):295-315.
DuMont, K., Mitchell-Herzfeld, S., Greene, R., Lee, E., Lowenfels, A., Rodriguez, M., & Dorabawila, V. (2008). Healthy Families New York (HFNY) randomized trial: effects on early child abuse and neglect. Child Abuse & Neglect, 32(3), 295-315. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2007.07.007
DuMont K, et al. Healthy Families New York (HFNY) Randomized Trial: Effects On Early Child Abuse and Neglect. Child Abuse Negl. 2008;32(3):295-315. PubMed PMID: 18377991.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Healthy Families New York (HFNY) randomized trial: effects on early child abuse and neglect. AU - DuMont,Kimberly, AU - Mitchell-Herzfeld,Susan, AU - Greene,Rose, AU - Lee,Eunju, AU - Lowenfels,Ann, AU - Rodriguez,Monica, AU - Dorabawila,Vajeera, PY - 2006/08/07/received PY - 2007/07/23/revised PY - 2007/07/25/accepted PY - 2008/4/2/pubmed PY - 2008/6/25/medline PY - 2008/4/2/entrez SP - 295 EP - 315 JF - Child abuse & neglect JO - Child Abuse Negl VL - 32 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a home visiting program modeled after Healthy Families America on parenting behaviors in the first 2 years of life. METHODS: A sample of 1173 families at risk for child abuse and neglect who met the criteria for Healthy Families New York (HFNY) was randomly assigned to either an intervention group that was offered HFNY or a control group that was given information and referrals to other services. Data were collected through a review of CPS records, and maternal interviews at baseline and the child's first birthday (90% re-interviewed) and second birthday (85% re-interviewed). RESULTS: HFNY mothers reported committing one-quarter as many acts of serious abuse at age 2 as control mothers (.01 versus .04, p<.05). Two sets of interactions were tested and found to have significant effects (p<.05). At age 2, young, first-time mothers in the HFNY group who were randomly assigned at 30 weeks of pregnancy or less were less likely than counterparts in the control group to engage in minor physical aggression in the past year (51% versus 70%) and harsh parenting in the past week (41% versus 62%). Among women who were "psychologically vulnerable," HFNY mothers were one-quarter as likely to report engaging in serious abuse and neglect as control mothers (5% versus 19%) at age 2. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that who is offered home visitation may be an important factor in explaining the differential effectiveness of home visitation programs. Improved effects may be realized by prioritizing the populations served or by enhancing the model to meet program objectives for hard-to-serve families. SN - 0145-2134 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18377991/Healthy_Families_New_York__HFNY__randomized_trial:_effects_on_early_child_abuse_and_neglect_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -