Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Overweight and obesity are associated with psychiatric disorders: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.
Psychosom Med. 2008 Apr; 70(3):288-97.PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study evaluated associations between body mass index (BMI) and psychiatric disorders.

METHODS

Data from 41,654 respondents in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions were analyzed.

RESULTS

After controlling for demographics, the continuous variable of BMI was significantly associated with most mood, anxiety, and personality disorders. When persons were classified into BMI categories of underweight, normal weight, overweight, obese, and extremely obese, both obese categories had significantly increased odds of any mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorder, as well as any personality disorder, with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 1.21 to 2.08. Specific Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-revision IV mood and personality disorders associated with obesity included major depression, dysthmia, and manic episode (ORs, 1.45-2.70) and antisocial, avoidant, schizoid, paranoid, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders (ORs, 1.31-2.55). Compared with normal weight individuals, being moderately overweight was significantly associated with anxiety and some substance use disorders, but not mood or personality disorders. Specific anxiety disorders that occurred at significantly higher rates among all categories of persons exceeding normal weight were generalized anxiety, panic without agoraphobia, and specific phobia (ORs, 1.23-2.60). Being underweight was significantly related to only a few disorders; it was positively related to specific phobia (OR, 1.31) and manic episode (OR, 1.83), and negatively associated with social phobia (OR, 0.60), panic disorder with agoraphobia (OR, 0.40), and avoidant personality disorder (OR, 0.59).

CONCLUSION

These data provide a systematic and comprehensive assessment of the association between body weight and psychiatric conditions. Interventions addressing weight loss may benefit from integrating treatment for psychiatric disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06030-3944, USA. petry@psychiatry.uchc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18378873

Citation

Petry, Nancy M., et al. "Overweight and Obesity Are Associated With Psychiatric Disorders: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey On Alcohol and Related Conditions." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 70, no. 3, 2008, pp. 288-97.
Petry NM, Barry D, Pietrzak RH, et al. Overweight and obesity are associated with psychiatric disorders: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Psychosom Med. 2008;70(3):288-97.
Petry, N. M., Barry, D., Pietrzak, R. H., & Wagner, J. A. (2008). Overweight and obesity are associated with psychiatric disorders: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Psychosomatic Medicine, 70(3), 288-97. https://doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181651651
Petry NM, et al. Overweight and Obesity Are Associated With Psychiatric Disorders: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey On Alcohol and Related Conditions. Psychosom Med. 2008;70(3):288-97. PubMed PMID: 18378873.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Overweight and obesity are associated with psychiatric disorders: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. AU - Petry,Nancy M, AU - Barry,Danielle, AU - Pietrzak,Robert H, AU - Wagner,Julie A, Y1 - 2008/03/31/ PY - 2008/4/2/pubmed PY - 2008/4/30/medline PY - 2008/4/2/entrez SP - 288 EP - 97 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 70 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated associations between body mass index (BMI) and psychiatric disorders. METHODS: Data from 41,654 respondents in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions were analyzed. RESULTS: After controlling for demographics, the continuous variable of BMI was significantly associated with most mood, anxiety, and personality disorders. When persons were classified into BMI categories of underweight, normal weight, overweight, obese, and extremely obese, both obese categories had significantly increased odds of any mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorder, as well as any personality disorder, with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 1.21 to 2.08. Specific Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-revision IV mood and personality disorders associated with obesity included major depression, dysthmia, and manic episode (ORs, 1.45-2.70) and antisocial, avoidant, schizoid, paranoid, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders (ORs, 1.31-2.55). Compared with normal weight individuals, being moderately overweight was significantly associated with anxiety and some substance use disorders, but not mood or personality disorders. Specific anxiety disorders that occurred at significantly higher rates among all categories of persons exceeding normal weight were generalized anxiety, panic without agoraphobia, and specific phobia (ORs, 1.23-2.60). Being underweight was significantly related to only a few disorders; it was positively related to specific phobia (OR, 1.31) and manic episode (OR, 1.83), and negatively associated with social phobia (OR, 0.60), panic disorder with agoraphobia (OR, 0.40), and avoidant personality disorder (OR, 0.59). CONCLUSION: These data provide a systematic and comprehensive assessment of the association between body weight and psychiatric conditions. Interventions addressing weight loss may benefit from integrating treatment for psychiatric disorders. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18378873/Overweight_and_obesity_are_associated_with_psychiatric_disorders:_results_from_the_National_Epidemiologic_Survey_on_Alcohol_and_Related_Conditions_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181651651 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -