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Brain reserve and the prevention of dementia.
Curr Opin Psychiatry 2008; 21(3):296-302CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

To evaluate and synthesize recent evidence linking mental activity and dementia risk, which commonly invokes 'brain reserve' as the mediating construct.

RECENT FINDINGS

Brain reserve has acquired several interpretations; however, the most reliable and practical definition focuses at the behavioural level by assessing frequency and range of participation in complex mental activities. Epidemiological research suggests a clear and consistent link of high brain reserve with reduced dementia risk. Furthermore, emerging clinical trials of cognitive exercise suggest that it may be effective for the prevention of longitudinal cognitive and functional decline. Recent animal studies implicate several mechanisms, including disease-dependent and disease-independent compensatory pathways.

SUMMARY

Given the precipitous forecasts for dementia over the coming decades, effective preventive strategies are of utmost importance. Findings from brain reserve studies now meet many of the formal criteria for causal agency between complex mental activity and reduced dementia risk. Key clinical trials are therefore under way to test these claims and results are keenly awaited.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales and Neuropsychiatric Institute, The Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia. michaelv@unsw.edu.au

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18382231

Citation

Valenzuela, Michael J.. "Brain Reserve and the Prevention of Dementia." Current Opinion in Psychiatry, vol. 21, no. 3, 2008, pp. 296-302.
Valenzuela MJ. Brain reserve and the prevention of dementia. Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2008;21(3):296-302.
Valenzuela, M. J. (2008). Brain reserve and the prevention of dementia. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 21(3), pp. 296-302. doi:10.1097/YCO.0b013e3282f97b1f.
Valenzuela MJ. Brain Reserve and the Prevention of Dementia. Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2008;21(3):296-302. PubMed PMID: 18382231.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Brain reserve and the prevention of dementia. A1 - Valenzuela,Michael J, PY - 2008/4/3/pubmed PY - 2008/7/25/medline PY - 2008/4/3/entrez SP - 296 EP - 302 JF - Current opinion in psychiatry JO - Curr Opin Psychiatry VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To evaluate and synthesize recent evidence linking mental activity and dementia risk, which commonly invokes 'brain reserve' as the mediating construct. RECENT FINDINGS: Brain reserve has acquired several interpretations; however, the most reliable and practical definition focuses at the behavioural level by assessing frequency and range of participation in complex mental activities. Epidemiological research suggests a clear and consistent link of high brain reserve with reduced dementia risk. Furthermore, emerging clinical trials of cognitive exercise suggest that it may be effective for the prevention of longitudinal cognitive and functional decline. Recent animal studies implicate several mechanisms, including disease-dependent and disease-independent compensatory pathways. SUMMARY: Given the precipitous forecasts for dementia over the coming decades, effective preventive strategies are of utmost importance. Findings from brain reserve studies now meet many of the formal criteria for causal agency between complex mental activity and reduced dementia risk. Key clinical trials are therefore under way to test these claims and results are keenly awaited. SN - 0951-7367 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18382231/Brain_reserve_and_the_prevention_of_dementia_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=18382231 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -