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Maternal employment and breastfeeding: results from the longitudinal study of Australian children.
Acta Paediatr 2008; 97(5):620-3AP

Abstract

AIM

To investigate the effect of maternal postnatal employment on breastfeeding duration in Australia in the first 6 months after birth.

METHOD

Secondary data analysis of the infant data (2004) from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). Complete maternal and breastfeeding data were available for 3,697 infants. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate the effect of timing of resumption of maternal employment and maternal employment status on breastfeeding at 6 months postpartum after adjustment for maternal education, maternal age, maternal smoking during pregnancy and socioeconomic status of the child's area of residence.

RESULTS

Fewer women employed full-time were breastfeeding their infants at 6 months (39%) than nonemployed women (56%). Participation in full-time employment before 6 months had a strong, negative effect on the likelihood of continuing breastfeeding for 6 months, adjusted OR = 0.35 (95%CI: 0.22-0.55). Compared to nonemployed women, fewer women in part-time employment were breastfeeding at 6 months (44%), adjusted OR = 0.49 (95% CI: 0.37-0.64).

CONCLUSIONS

Results from this large representative cohort of Australian infants confirm that maternal employment in the first 6 months of life contributes to premature cessation of breastfeeding even when known risk factors for breastfeeding cessation are controlled for.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Centre for Women's Health in Society, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. a.cooklin@pgrad.unimelb.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18394107

Citation

Cooklin, Amanda R., et al. "Maternal Employment and Breastfeeding: Results From the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children." Acta Paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992), vol. 97, no. 5, 2008, pp. 620-3.
Cooklin AR, Donath SM, Amir LH. Maternal employment and breastfeeding: results from the longitudinal study of Australian children. Acta Paediatr. 2008;97(5):620-3.
Cooklin, A. R., Donath, S. M., & Amir, L. H. (2008). Maternal employment and breastfeeding: results from the longitudinal study of Australian children. Acta Paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992), 97(5), pp. 620-3. doi:10.1111/j.1651-2227.2008.00740.x.
Cooklin AR, Donath SM, Amir LH. Maternal Employment and Breastfeeding: Results From the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Acta Paediatr. 2008;97(5):620-3. PubMed PMID: 18394107.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal employment and breastfeeding: results from the longitudinal study of Australian children. AU - Cooklin,Amanda R, AU - Donath,Susan M, AU - Amir,Lisa H, PY - 2008/4/9/pubmed PY - 2008/8/14/medline PY - 2008/4/9/entrez SP - 620 EP - 3 JF - Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992) JO - Acta Paediatr. VL - 97 IS - 5 N2 - AIM: To investigate the effect of maternal postnatal employment on breastfeeding duration in Australia in the first 6 months after birth. METHOD: Secondary data analysis of the infant data (2004) from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). Complete maternal and breastfeeding data were available for 3,697 infants. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate the effect of timing of resumption of maternal employment and maternal employment status on breastfeeding at 6 months postpartum after adjustment for maternal education, maternal age, maternal smoking during pregnancy and socioeconomic status of the child's area of residence. RESULTS: Fewer women employed full-time were breastfeeding their infants at 6 months (39%) than nonemployed women (56%). Participation in full-time employment before 6 months had a strong, negative effect on the likelihood of continuing breastfeeding for 6 months, adjusted OR = 0.35 (95%CI: 0.22-0.55). Compared to nonemployed women, fewer women in part-time employment were breastfeeding at 6 months (44%), adjusted OR = 0.49 (95% CI: 0.37-0.64). CONCLUSIONS: Results from this large representative cohort of Australian infants confirm that maternal employment in the first 6 months of life contributes to premature cessation of breastfeeding even when known risk factors for breastfeeding cessation are controlled for. SN - 0803-5253 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18394107/Maternal_employment_and_breastfeeding:_results_from_the_longitudinal_study_of_Australian_children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2008.00740.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -