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[Human monkeypox].
Pathol Biol (Paris). 2009 Mar; 57(2):175-83.PB

Abstract

Unlike other recent viral emergences, which were in majority caused by RNA viruses, the monkeypox results from infection by a DNA virus, an orthopoxvirus closely related to both vaccine and smallpox viruses and whose two genomic variants are known. Unexpectedly isolated from captive Asiatic monkeys and first considered as an laboratory curiosity, this virus was recognised in 1970 as an human pathogen in tropical Africa. Here it was responsible for sporadic cases following intrusions (for hunting) into tropical rain forests or rare outbreak with human-to-human transmission as observed in 1996 in Democratic Republic of Congo. As monkeypox in humans is not distinguishable from smallpox (a disease globally eradicated in 1977) it was only subjected to vigilant epidemiological surveillance and not considered as a potential threat outside Africa. This point of view radically changed in 2003 when monkeypox was introduced in the USA by African wild rodents and spread to 11 different states of this country. Responsible for 82 infections in American children and adults, this outbreak led to realize the sanitary hazards resulting from international trade of exotic animals and scientific investigations increasing extensively our knowledge of this zoonosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

3, rue Rouget-de-l'Isle, 292002 Brest, France. chastelc@aol.com

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

fre

PubMed ID

18394820

Citation

Chastel, C. "[Human Monkeypox]." Pathologie-biologie, vol. 57, no. 2, 2009, pp. 175-83.
Chastel C. [Human monkeypox]. Pathol Biol (Paris). 2009;57(2):175-83.
Chastel, C. (2009). [Human monkeypox]. Pathologie-biologie, 57(2), 175-83. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.patbio.2008.02.006
Chastel C. [Human Monkeypox]. Pathol Biol (Paris). 2009;57(2):175-83. PubMed PMID: 18394820.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Human monkeypox]. A1 - Chastel,C, Y1 - 2008/04/03/ PY - 2007/12/10/received PY - 2008/02/11/accepted PY - 2008/4/9/pubmed PY - 2009/7/30/medline PY - 2008/4/9/entrez SP - 175 EP - 83 JF - Pathologie-biologie JO - Pathol Biol (Paris) VL - 57 IS - 2 N2 - Unlike other recent viral emergences, which were in majority caused by RNA viruses, the monkeypox results from infection by a DNA virus, an orthopoxvirus closely related to both vaccine and smallpox viruses and whose two genomic variants are known. Unexpectedly isolated from captive Asiatic monkeys and first considered as an laboratory curiosity, this virus was recognised in 1970 as an human pathogen in tropical Africa. Here it was responsible for sporadic cases following intrusions (for hunting) into tropical rain forests or rare outbreak with human-to-human transmission as observed in 1996 in Democratic Republic of Congo. As monkeypox in humans is not distinguishable from smallpox (a disease globally eradicated in 1977) it was only subjected to vigilant epidemiological surveillance and not considered as a potential threat outside Africa. This point of view radically changed in 2003 when monkeypox was introduced in the USA by African wild rodents and spread to 11 different states of this country. Responsible for 82 infections in American children and adults, this outbreak led to realize the sanitary hazards resulting from international trade of exotic animals and scientific investigations increasing extensively our knowledge of this zoonosis. SN - 0369-8114 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18394820/[Human_monkeypox]_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0369-8114(08)00031-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -