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Pre-natal exposure to paracetamol and risk of wheezing and asthma in children: a birth cohort study.
Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Jun; 37(3):583-90.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Paracetamol use has been associated with increased prevalence of asthma in children and adults, and one study reported an association between pre-natal exposure to paracetamol and asthma in early childhood.

METHODS

To examine if pre-natal exposure to paracetamol is associated with the risk of asthma or wheezing in early childhood, we selected 66 445 women from the Danish National Birth Cohort for whom we had information on paracetamol use during pregnancy and who participated in an interview when their children were 18-months-old and 12 733 women whose children had reached the age of 7 and estimated the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma and wheezing at the ages of 18 months and 7 years. We also linked our population to the Danish National Hospital Registry to record all hospitalizations due to asthma up to age of 18 months.

RESULTS

Paracetamol use during any time of pregnancy was associated with a small but statistically significant increased risk of physician-diagnosed asthma or bronchitis among children at 18 months [relative risk (RR) = 1.17, 1.13-1.23)], hospitalizations due to asthma up to 18 months (hazard ratio = 1.24, 1.11-1.38) and physician-diagnosed asthma at 7 years (RR = 1.15, 1.02-1.29). The highest risks were observed for paracetamol use during the first trimester of pregnancy and persistent wheezing (wheezing at both 18 months and 7 years) (RR = 1.45, 1.13-1.85).

CONCLUSION

Paracetamol use during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of asthma and wheezing in childhood. If this association is causal, we may need to revisit the clinical practice on use of paracetamol during pregnancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain. crebordosa@imim.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18400839

Citation

Rebordosa, Cristina, et al. "Pre-natal Exposure to Paracetamol and Risk of Wheezing and Asthma in Children: a Birth Cohort Study." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 37, no. 3, 2008, pp. 583-90.
Rebordosa C, Kogevinas M, Sørensen HT, et al. Pre-natal exposure to paracetamol and risk of wheezing and asthma in children: a birth cohort study. Int J Epidemiol. 2008;37(3):583-90.
Rebordosa, C., Kogevinas, M., Sørensen, H. T., & Olsen, J. (2008). Pre-natal exposure to paracetamol and risk of wheezing and asthma in children: a birth cohort study. International Journal of Epidemiology, 37(3), 583-90. https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyn070
Rebordosa C, et al. Pre-natal Exposure to Paracetamol and Risk of Wheezing and Asthma in Children: a Birth Cohort Study. Int J Epidemiol. 2008;37(3):583-90. PubMed PMID: 18400839.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pre-natal exposure to paracetamol and risk of wheezing and asthma in children: a birth cohort study. AU - Rebordosa,Cristina, AU - Kogevinas,Manolis, AU - Sørensen,Henrik T, AU - Olsen,Jørn, Y1 - 2008/04/09/ PY - 2008/4/11/pubmed PY - 2008/8/16/medline PY - 2008/4/11/entrez SP - 583 EP - 90 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 37 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Paracetamol use has been associated with increased prevalence of asthma in children and adults, and one study reported an association between pre-natal exposure to paracetamol and asthma in early childhood. METHODS: To examine if pre-natal exposure to paracetamol is associated with the risk of asthma or wheezing in early childhood, we selected 66 445 women from the Danish National Birth Cohort for whom we had information on paracetamol use during pregnancy and who participated in an interview when their children were 18-months-old and 12 733 women whose children had reached the age of 7 and estimated the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma and wheezing at the ages of 18 months and 7 years. We also linked our population to the Danish National Hospital Registry to record all hospitalizations due to asthma up to age of 18 months. RESULTS: Paracetamol use during any time of pregnancy was associated with a small but statistically significant increased risk of physician-diagnosed asthma or bronchitis among children at 18 months [relative risk (RR) = 1.17, 1.13-1.23)], hospitalizations due to asthma up to 18 months (hazard ratio = 1.24, 1.11-1.38) and physician-diagnosed asthma at 7 years (RR = 1.15, 1.02-1.29). The highest risks were observed for paracetamol use during the first trimester of pregnancy and persistent wheezing (wheezing at both 18 months and 7 years) (RR = 1.45, 1.13-1.85). CONCLUSION: Paracetamol use during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of asthma and wheezing in childhood. If this association is causal, we may need to revisit the clinical practice on use of paracetamol during pregnancy. SN - 1464-3685 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18400839/Pre_natal_exposure_to_paracetamol_and_risk_of_wheezing_and_asthma_in_children:_a_birth_cohort_study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/dyn070 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -