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Pill-poppers and dopers: a comparison of non-medical prescription drug use and illicit/street drug use among college students.
Addict Behav. 2008 Jul; 33(7):934-41.AB

Abstract

Data from the 2001 College Alcohol Study, a national sample of U.S. college students, were used to conduct multinomial logistic regression analysis examining correlates of substance use. Students were divided into three groups based on their lifetime substance use: non-users, non-medical prescription drug use only, and illicit/street drug use only. The purpose of this analytic strategy was to examine the similarities/differences in the correlates of non-medical prescription drug use and illicit/street drug use. Findings indicate that race, age, G.P.A., sexual activity, health, binge drinking, marijuana use, social bonding and social learning measures are correlates of non-medical prescription drug use. Correlates of illicit/street drug use include gender, Hispanic ethnicity, sexual activity, binge drinking, marijuana use, social bonding and social learning measures. Finally, the focus of the paper is a comparison of students who report only non-medical prescription drug use to students who report only illicit/street drug use. Findings indicate that gender, race, marital status, sexual activity, marijuana use, and social bonding measures significantly distinguish illicit/street drug use from non-medical prescription drug use. Important implications, limitations, and future research needs were discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sociology, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-1360, USA. jaford@mail.ucf.edu <jaford@mail.ucf.edu>No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18403131

Citation

Ford, Jason A., and Meagan C. Arrastia. "Pill-poppers and Dopers: a Comparison of Non-medical Prescription Drug Use and Illicit/street Drug Use Among College Students." Addictive Behaviors, vol. 33, no. 7, 2008, pp. 934-41.
Ford JA, Arrastia MC. Pill-poppers and dopers: a comparison of non-medical prescription drug use and illicit/street drug use among college students. Addict Behav. 2008;33(7):934-41.
Ford, J. A., & Arrastia, M. C. (2008). Pill-poppers and dopers: a comparison of non-medical prescription drug use and illicit/street drug use among college students. Addictive Behaviors, 33(7), 934-41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2008.02.016
Ford JA, Arrastia MC. Pill-poppers and Dopers: a Comparison of Non-medical Prescription Drug Use and Illicit/street Drug Use Among College Students. Addict Behav. 2008;33(7):934-41. PubMed PMID: 18403131.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pill-poppers and dopers: a comparison of non-medical prescription drug use and illicit/street drug use among college students. AU - Ford,Jason A, AU - Arrastia,Meagan C, Y1 - 2008/03/04/ PY - 2007/10/26/received PY - 2008/02/25/accepted PY - 2008/4/12/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/4/12/entrez SP - 934 EP - 41 JF - Addictive behaviors JO - Addict Behav VL - 33 IS - 7 N2 - Data from the 2001 College Alcohol Study, a national sample of U.S. college students, were used to conduct multinomial logistic regression analysis examining correlates of substance use. Students were divided into three groups based on their lifetime substance use: non-users, non-medical prescription drug use only, and illicit/street drug use only. The purpose of this analytic strategy was to examine the similarities/differences in the correlates of non-medical prescription drug use and illicit/street drug use. Findings indicate that race, age, G.P.A., sexual activity, health, binge drinking, marijuana use, social bonding and social learning measures are correlates of non-medical prescription drug use. Correlates of illicit/street drug use include gender, Hispanic ethnicity, sexual activity, binge drinking, marijuana use, social bonding and social learning measures. Finally, the focus of the paper is a comparison of students who report only non-medical prescription drug use to students who report only illicit/street drug use. Findings indicate that gender, race, marital status, sexual activity, marijuana use, and social bonding measures significantly distinguish illicit/street drug use from non-medical prescription drug use. Important implications, limitations, and future research needs were discussed. SN - 0306-4603 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18403131/Pill_poppers_and_dopers:_a_comparison_of_non_medical_prescription_drug_use_and_illicit/street_drug_use_among_college_students_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4603(08)00054-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -