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Influence of very long-chain n-3 fatty acids on plasma markers of inflammation in middle-aged men.
Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2008 Mar; 78(3):219-28.PL

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of a moderate dose of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (1.8 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus 0.3g docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) per day) given for 8 weeks to healthy middle-aged males on cardiovascular risk factors, particularly plasma lipids and inflammatory markers. The study was double-blind and placebo-controlled. The proportion of EPA was significantly increased in plasma phosphatidylcholine (from 1.4% to 5.0% of total fatty acids; P<0.001), cholesteryl esters (from 1.2% to 4.5%; P<0.001) and triacylglycerols (from 0.3% to 1.8%; P<0.001). In contrast, the more modest increases in DHA in these lipid fractions were not significant. There was very little effect of n-3 fatty acids on the risk factors measured, apart from a reduction in plasma soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)-1 concentration compared with placebo (P=0.05). The change in plasma sICAM-1 concentration was significantly inversely related to the change in DHA in plasma phosphatidylcholine (r=-0.675; P=0.001), but less so to the change in EPA (r=-0.406; P=0.076). Data from the present study suggest that marine oil providing 1.8 g of EPA plus 0.3g DHA/day is not sufficient to demonstrate marked effects on cardiovascular risk factors (plasma lipids and inflammatory markers) in healthy middle-aged men, although there may be a slight anti-inflammatory effect as indicated by the decrease in sICAM-1. The stronger association between changes in DHA than EPA and sICAM-1 concentrations suggest that DHA may be more anti-inflammatory than EPA. Thus, one reason why only limited effects were seen here may be that the dose of DHA provided was insufficient.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton , UK. hmy1@soton.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18403189

Citation

Yusof, Hayati M., et al. "Influence of Very Long-chain N-3 Fatty Acids On Plasma Markers of Inflammation in Middle-aged Men." Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, vol. 78, no. 3, 2008, pp. 219-28.
Yusof HM, Miles EA, Calder P. Influence of very long-chain n-3 fatty acids on plasma markers of inflammation in middle-aged men. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2008;78(3):219-28.
Yusof, H. M., Miles, E. A., & Calder, P. (2008). Influence of very long-chain n-3 fatty acids on plasma markers of inflammation in middle-aged men. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, 78(3), 219-28. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.plefa.2008.02.002
Yusof HM, Miles EA, Calder P. Influence of Very Long-chain N-3 Fatty Acids On Plasma Markers of Inflammation in Middle-aged Men. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2008;78(3):219-28. PubMed PMID: 18403189.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of very long-chain n-3 fatty acids on plasma markers of inflammation in middle-aged men. AU - Yusof,Hayati M, AU - Miles,Elizabeth A, AU - Calder,Philip, Y1 - 2008/04/09/ PY - 2007/11/26/received PY - 2008/02/20/revised PY - 2008/02/28/accepted PY - 2008/4/12/pubmed PY - 2008/8/7/medline PY - 2008/4/12/entrez SP - 219 EP - 28 JF - Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and essential fatty acids JO - Prostaglandins Leukot. Essent. Fatty Acids VL - 78 IS - 3 N2 - This study investigated the effects of a moderate dose of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (1.8 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus 0.3g docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) per day) given for 8 weeks to healthy middle-aged males on cardiovascular risk factors, particularly plasma lipids and inflammatory markers. The study was double-blind and placebo-controlled. The proportion of EPA was significantly increased in plasma phosphatidylcholine (from 1.4% to 5.0% of total fatty acids; P<0.001), cholesteryl esters (from 1.2% to 4.5%; P<0.001) and triacylglycerols (from 0.3% to 1.8%; P<0.001). In contrast, the more modest increases in DHA in these lipid fractions were not significant. There was very little effect of n-3 fatty acids on the risk factors measured, apart from a reduction in plasma soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)-1 concentration compared with placebo (P=0.05). The change in plasma sICAM-1 concentration was significantly inversely related to the change in DHA in plasma phosphatidylcholine (r=-0.675; P=0.001), but less so to the change in EPA (r=-0.406; P=0.076). Data from the present study suggest that marine oil providing 1.8 g of EPA plus 0.3g DHA/day is not sufficient to demonstrate marked effects on cardiovascular risk factors (plasma lipids and inflammatory markers) in healthy middle-aged men, although there may be a slight anti-inflammatory effect as indicated by the decrease in sICAM-1. The stronger association between changes in DHA than EPA and sICAM-1 concentrations suggest that DHA may be more anti-inflammatory than EPA. Thus, one reason why only limited effects were seen here may be that the dose of DHA provided was insufficient. SN - 0952-3278 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18403189/Influence_of_very_long_chain_n_3_fatty_acids_on_plasma_markers_of_inflammation_in_middle_aged_men_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0952-3278(08)00028-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -