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Treatment of advanced-stage Kienböck's disease with proximal row carpectomy: an average 15-year follow-up.
J Hand Surg Am. 2008 Apr; 33(4):493-502.JH

Abstract

PURPOSE

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical results of a proximal row carpectomy with an average 15-year follow-up for the primary treatment of advanced-stage (Lichtman IIIA and IIIB) Kienböck's disease. This study is a follow-up to a paper by the senior author in a similar cohort of patients where the clinical results of a proximal row carpectomy were evaluated for the treatment of advanced-stage Kienböck's disease at an average 3-year follow-up.

METHODS

Seventeen patients with a minimum of 10 years of follow-up were identified who met criteria for inclusion. Thirteen of these patients were located and agreed to participate. Patients were seen, examined, and queried regarding their wrists. Range of motion, grip strength, and subjective patient satisfaction were all obtained and quantified using a clinical outcomes scale.

RESULTS

Twelve of 13 patients demonstrated excellent or good results based on the clinical outcomes scale used (5 excellent, 7 good, 1 fair, and none poor). Total arc of motion averaged 73% of the uninvolved side. Grip strength averaged 92% of the uninvolved side. Compared with preoperative values, range of motion improved an average of 16% and grip strength improved an average of 129%, an overall average improvement of 12 degrees and 18 kg, respectively. At the most recent follow-up, all patients remained employed. Seven patients held manual labor positions, 2 were nurses, and 4 were employed in sedentary vocations. All patients demonstrated some degree of degenerative changes, usually localized to the radiocapitate articulation in the lunate fossa. Clinical results did not correlate with radiographic degeneration.

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrates proximal row carpectomy to be a reliable motion-preserving procedure with good clinical results maintained out to an average of 15 years postoperatively.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hand and Upper Extremity Center of Northeast Wisconsin, Appleton, WI, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18406952

Citation

Lumsden, Boyd C., et al. "Treatment of Advanced-stage Kienböck's Disease With Proximal Row Carpectomy: an Average 15-year Follow-up." The Journal of Hand Surgery, vol. 33, no. 4, 2008, pp. 493-502.
Lumsden BC, Stone A, Engber WD. Treatment of advanced-stage Kienböck's disease with proximal row carpectomy: an average 15-year follow-up. J Hand Surg Am. 2008;33(4):493-502.
Lumsden, B. C., Stone, A., & Engber, W. D. (2008). Treatment of advanced-stage Kienböck's disease with proximal row carpectomy: an average 15-year follow-up. The Journal of Hand Surgery, 33(4), 493-502. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2007.12.010
Lumsden BC, Stone A, Engber WD. Treatment of Advanced-stage Kienböck's Disease With Proximal Row Carpectomy: an Average 15-year Follow-up. J Hand Surg Am. 2008;33(4):493-502. PubMed PMID: 18406952.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Treatment of advanced-stage Kienböck's disease with proximal row carpectomy: an average 15-year follow-up. AU - Lumsden,Boyd C, AU - Stone,Addison, AU - Engber,William D, PY - 2007/12/17/received PY - 2007/12/19/accepted PY - 2008/4/15/pubmed PY - 2008/7/30/medline PY - 2008/4/15/entrez SP - 493 EP - 502 JF - The Journal of hand surgery JO - J Hand Surg Am VL - 33 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical results of a proximal row carpectomy with an average 15-year follow-up for the primary treatment of advanced-stage (Lichtman IIIA and IIIB) Kienböck's disease. This study is a follow-up to a paper by the senior author in a similar cohort of patients where the clinical results of a proximal row carpectomy were evaluated for the treatment of advanced-stage Kienböck's disease at an average 3-year follow-up. METHODS: Seventeen patients with a minimum of 10 years of follow-up were identified who met criteria for inclusion. Thirteen of these patients were located and agreed to participate. Patients were seen, examined, and queried regarding their wrists. Range of motion, grip strength, and subjective patient satisfaction were all obtained and quantified using a clinical outcomes scale. RESULTS: Twelve of 13 patients demonstrated excellent or good results based on the clinical outcomes scale used (5 excellent, 7 good, 1 fair, and none poor). Total arc of motion averaged 73% of the uninvolved side. Grip strength averaged 92% of the uninvolved side. Compared with preoperative values, range of motion improved an average of 16% and grip strength improved an average of 129%, an overall average improvement of 12 degrees and 18 kg, respectively. At the most recent follow-up, all patients remained employed. Seven patients held manual labor positions, 2 were nurses, and 4 were employed in sedentary vocations. All patients demonstrated some degree of degenerative changes, usually localized to the radiocapitate articulation in the lunate fossa. Clinical results did not correlate with radiographic degeneration. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates proximal row carpectomy to be a reliable motion-preserving procedure with good clinical results maintained out to an average of 15 years postoperatively. SN - 0363-5023 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18406952/Treatment_of_advanced_stage_Kienböck's_disease_with_proximal_row_carpectomy:_an_average_15_year_follow_up_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0363-5023(07)01101-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -