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Evaluation of body fat estimated from body mass index and impedance in Belgian male military candidates: comparing two methods for estimating body composition.
Mil Med 2008; 173(3):266-70MM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The study objective was to evaluate whether a classification based on body mass index (BMI) agrees with a classification based on body fat mass, estimated by bioelectrical impedance.

METHODS

A random sample of 448 male candidates between 18 and 20 years was selected during their medical visit in a military recruitment center. BMI was determined as weight/height2 and was considered normal between 20.0 and 25.0 kg/m2 (cfr. WHO classification). Percentage of body fat was estimated with bioelectrical impedance, using the Omron Body Fat Analyzer HBF-306. Subjects with a body fat percentage measured by bipolar bioelectrical impedance analysis (BF%(IMP)) < or = 20.9% were considered normal weight, while subjects with a BF%(IMP) > or = 21.0% were considered overweight. We used the following classification: true positives were normal scores for BMI and impedance; false positives were normal scores for BMI but not for impedance; true negatives were overweight scores for BMI and for impedance; and false negatives were overweight scores for BMI but not for impedance. Data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical program.

RESULTS

BMI ranged from 17.0 to 29.4 kg/m2; percentage of fat mass varied between 5.3 and 31.4% of body weight. Of the total sample, 328 (73.2%) candidates were classified as true positive, 29 (6.5%) as false negative, 47 (10.5%) as false positive, and finally 44 (9.8%) as true negative. The difference in classification in normal weight versus overweight between the BMI method and the bipolar bioelectrical impedance method was statistically significant (chi2 with one df = 86.04; p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

To limit false-negative classifications, additional impedance measurements in the BMI category between 25.0 and 27.0 kg/m2 is mandatory to determine whether there is really an excess fat mass.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Queen Astrid Military Hospital, Bruynstraat 1, B-1120 Brussels, Belgium.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18419029

Citation

Mullie, Patrick, et al. "Evaluation of Body Fat Estimated From Body Mass Index and Impedance in Belgian Male Military Candidates: Comparing Two Methods for Estimating Body Composition." Military Medicine, vol. 173, no. 3, 2008, pp. 266-70.
Mullie P, Vansant G, Hulens M, et al. Evaluation of body fat estimated from body mass index and impedance in Belgian male military candidates: comparing two methods for estimating body composition. Mil Med. 2008;173(3):266-70.
Mullie, P., Vansant, G., Hulens, M., Clarys, P., & Degrave, E. (2008). Evaluation of body fat estimated from body mass index and impedance in Belgian male military candidates: comparing two methods for estimating body composition. Military Medicine, 173(3), pp. 266-70.
Mullie P, et al. Evaluation of Body Fat Estimated From Body Mass Index and Impedance in Belgian Male Military Candidates: Comparing Two Methods for Estimating Body Composition. Mil Med. 2008;173(3):266-70. PubMed PMID: 18419029.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation of body fat estimated from body mass index and impedance in Belgian male military candidates: comparing two methods for estimating body composition. AU - Mullie,Patrick, AU - Vansant,Greet, AU - Hulens,Mieke, AU - Clarys,Peter, AU - Degrave,Etienne, PY - 2008/4/19/pubmed PY - 2008/5/15/medline PY - 2008/4/19/entrez SP - 266 EP - 70 JF - Military medicine JO - Mil Med VL - 173 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The study objective was to evaluate whether a classification based on body mass index (BMI) agrees with a classification based on body fat mass, estimated by bioelectrical impedance. METHODS: A random sample of 448 male candidates between 18 and 20 years was selected during their medical visit in a military recruitment center. BMI was determined as weight/height2 and was considered normal between 20.0 and 25.0 kg/m2 (cfr. WHO classification). Percentage of body fat was estimated with bioelectrical impedance, using the Omron Body Fat Analyzer HBF-306. Subjects with a body fat percentage measured by bipolar bioelectrical impedance analysis (BF%(IMP)) < or = 20.9% were considered normal weight, while subjects with a BF%(IMP) > or = 21.0% were considered overweight. We used the following classification: true positives were normal scores for BMI and impedance; false positives were normal scores for BMI but not for impedance; true negatives were overweight scores for BMI and for impedance; and false negatives were overweight scores for BMI but not for impedance. Data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical program. RESULTS: BMI ranged from 17.0 to 29.4 kg/m2; percentage of fat mass varied between 5.3 and 31.4% of body weight. Of the total sample, 328 (73.2%) candidates were classified as true positive, 29 (6.5%) as false negative, 47 (10.5%) as false positive, and finally 44 (9.8%) as true negative. The difference in classification in normal weight versus overweight between the BMI method and the bipolar bioelectrical impedance method was statistically significant (chi2 with one df = 86.04; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: To limit false-negative classifications, additional impedance measurements in the BMI category between 25.0 and 27.0 kg/m2 is mandatory to determine whether there is really an excess fat mass. SN - 0026-4075 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18419029/Evaluation_of_body_fat_estimated_from_body_mass_index_and_impedance_in_Belgian_male_military_candidates:_comparing_two_methods_for_estimating_body_composition_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/milmed/article-lookup/doi/10.7205/milmed.173.3.266 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -